Learn More
Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibril may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of rate constants(More)
beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) is the primary constituent of senile plaques, a defining feature of Alzheimer's disease. Aggregated Abeta is toxic to neurons, but the mechanism of toxicity remains unproven. One proposal is that Abeta toxicity results from relatively nonspecific Abeta-membrane interactions. We hypothesized that Abeta perturbs membrane structure(More)
Tungsten has been associated with protein aggregation in prefilled syringes (PFSs). This study probed the relationship between PFSs, tungsten, visible particles, and protein aggregates. Experiments were carried out spiking solutions of two different model proteins with tungsten species obtained from the extraction of tungsten pins typically used in syringe(More)
beta-Amyloid (Abeta), the primary protein component of Alzheimer's plaques, is neurotoxic when aggregated into fibrils. We have devised a modular strategy for generating compounds that inhibit Abeta toxicity, based on linking a recognition element for Abeta to a disrupting element designed to interfere with Abeta aggregation. One such compound, with the(More)
Spontaneous conversion of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) from soluble monomer to insoluble fibrillar precipitate may underlie the neurodegeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease. A complete description of Abeta self-association kinetics requires identification of the oligomeric species present and the pathway of association, as well as quantitation of(More)
  • 1