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A long-term goal of numerous research projects is to identify biomarkers for in vitro systems predicting toxicity in vivo. Often, transcriptomics data are used to identify candidates for further evaluation. However, a systematic directory summarizing key features of chemically influenced genes in human hepatocytes is not yet available. To bridge this gap,(More)
The traditional 2-year cancer bioassay needs replacement by more cost-effective and predictive tests. The use of toxicogenomics in an in vitro system may provide a more high-throughput method to investigate early alterations induced by carcinogens. Recently, the differential gene expression response in wild-type and cancer-prone Xpa −/− p53 +/− primary(More)
Under REACH, the European Community Regulation on chemicals, the testing strategy for carcinogenicity is based on in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Given that non-genotoxic carcinogens are negative for genotoxicity and chronic bioassays are no longer regularly performed, this class of carcinogens will go undetected. Therefore, test systems detecting(More)
Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental(More)
The tumour suppressor p53 is one of the most important cancer genes. Previous findings have shown that p53 expression can influence DNA adduct formation of the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in human cells, indicating a role for p53 in the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1-mediated biotransformation of BaP in vitro. We investigated the potential role(More)
There is a high need to improve the assessment of, especially non-genotoxic, carcinogenic features of chemicals. We therefore explored a toxicogenomics-based approach using genome-wide microRNA and mRNA expression profiles upon short-term exposure in mice. For this, wild-type mice were exposed for seven days to three different classes of chemicals, i.e.,(More)
The expression of the tumor suppressor p53 can influence the bioactivation of, and DNA damage induced by, the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene, indicating a role for p53 in its cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated biotransformation. The carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), which is formed during the cooking of food, is also(More)
Transcriptomics in combination with in vitro cell systems is a powerful approach to unravel modes of action of toxicants. An important question is to which extent the modes of action as revealed by transcriptomics depend on cell type, species and study type (in vitro or in vivo). To acquire more insight into this, we assessed the transcriptomic effects of(More)
Alternative methods to detect non-genotoxic carcinogens are urgently needed, as this class of carcinogens goes undetected in the current testing strategy for carcinogenicity under REACH. A complicating factor is that non-genotoxic carcinogens act through several distinctive modes of action, which makes prediction of their carcinogenic property difficult. We(More)
Liver injury is the leading cause of drug-induced toxicity. For the evaluation of a chemical compound to induce toxicity, in this case steatosis or fatty liver, it is imperative to identify markers reflective of mechanisms and processes induced upon exposure, as these will be the earliest changes reflective of disease. Therefore, an in vivo mouse(More)