Minna K. Männistö

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Soil nitrogen (N) availability and pH constitute major abiotic controls over microbial community composition and activity in tundra ecosystems. On the other hand, mammalian grazers form an important biotic factor influencing resource coupling between plants and soil microorganisms. To investigate individual effects and interactions among soil nutrients, pH,(More)
Tundra soils, which usually contain low concentrations of soil nutrients and have a low pH, store a large proportion of the global soil carbon (C) pool. The importance of soil nitrogen (N) availability for microbial activity in the tundra has received a great deal of attention; however, although soil pH is known to exert a considerable impact on microbial(More)
Granulicella mallensis MP5ACTX8(T) is a novel species of the genus Granulicella in subdivision 1of Acidobacteria. G. mallensis is of ecological interest being a member of the dominant soil bacterial community active at low temperatures and nutrient limiting conditions in Arctic alpine tundra. G. mallensis is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile(More)
There is rising awareness that different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have different autoecology and occupy different soil niches and that the benefits they provide to the host plant are dependent on plant-AM fungus combination. However, the role and community composition of AM fungi in succession are not well known and the northern latitudes remain(More)
Terriglobus saanensis SP1PR4(T) is a novel species of the genus Terriglobus. T. saanensis is of ecological interest because it is a representative of the phylum Acidobacteria, which are dominant members of bacterial soil microbiota in Arctic ecosystems. T. saanensis is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile heterotroph utilizing a suite of simple sugars(More)
Granulicella tundricola strain MP5ACTX9(T) is a novel species of the genus Granulicella in subdivision 1 Acidobacteria. G. tundricola is a predominant member of soil bacterial communities, active at low temperatures and nutrient limiting conditions in Arctic alpine tundra. The organism is a cold-adapted acidophile and a versatile heterotroph that hydrolyzes(More)
Microorganisms are prime drivers of ecosystem functions in the Arctic, and they are essential for vegetation succession. However, very little is known about the phylogenetic and functional diversities of the bacterial communities associated with Arctic plants, especially in low organic matter soils. Here, we studied the diversity and community structure of(More)
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