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Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is lethal to animals because it activates cytokine release, causing septic shock and tissue injury. Early proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and interleukin [IL]-1) released within the first few hours of endotoxemia stimulate mediator cascades that persist for days and can lead to death. High mobility group(More)
The local production of proinflammatory cytokines mediates the host response to inflammation, infection, and injury, whereas an overexpression of these mediators can injure or kill the host. Recently, we identified a class of multivalent guanylhydrazone compounds that are effective inhibitors of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in monocytes/macrophages.(More)
The innate immune system functions as a defensive front line against pathogenic invasion, but the proinflammatory products of activated monocytes and macrophages (e.g., TNF and NO) can also injure normal cells. Anti-inflammatory mediators restrain the innate immune response and prevent excessive collateral tissue damage. Spermine, a ubiquitous biogenic(More)
The gene responsible for X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has been recently identified to code for a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (Bruton's agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase, BTK), required for normal B cell development. BTK, like many other cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, contains Src homology domains (SH2 and SH3), and catalytic kinase domain. SH3 domains(More)
Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is lethal to animals because it activates cytokine release, causing septic shock and tissue injury. Early proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor [TNF] and interleukin [IL]-1) released within the first few hours of endotoxemia stimulate mediator cascades that persist for days and can lead to death. High mobility group(More)
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