Miller B. Jones

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Neuronal G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs, Kir3.x) can be activated or inhibited by distinct classes of receptors (Galphai/o and Galphaq/11-coupled, respectively), providing dynamic regulation of neuronal excitability. In this mini-review, we highlight findings from our laboratory in which we used a mammalian heterologous(More)
Heterotrimeric G proteins are molecular switches that regulate numerous signaling pathways involved in cellular physiology. This characteristic is achieved by the adoption of two principal states: an inactive, GDP bound state and an active, GTP bound state. Under basal conditions, G proteins exist in the inactive, GDP bound state; thus, nucleotide exchange(More)
Heterotrimeric G proteins relay information between cell surface receptors and effector molecules in diverse signaling pathways to mediate critical cellular processes in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Multiple isoforms of each of the three G protein subunits yield enormous structural and functional diversity. G proteins are thus obvious(More)
G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels can be activated or inhibited by different classes of receptors, suggesting a role for G proteins in determining signaling specificity. Because G protein bg subunits containing either b1 or b2 with multiple Gg subunits activate GIRK channels, we hypothesized that specificity might be imparted(More)
G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels can be activated or inhibited by different classes of receptors, suggesting a role for G proteins in determining signaling specificity. Because G protein betagamma subunits containing either beta1 or beta2 with multiple Ggamma subunits activate GIRK channels, we hypothesized that specificity(More)
Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins are important mediators in signal transduction and function by transmitting information from membrane-bound receptors to effectors. Because these proteins are membrane bound and contain covalent lipid modifications, detergents are required for solubilization and purification. It was discovered that the(More)
GPSM2 (G-protein signalling modulator 2; also known as LGN or mammalian Pins) is a protein that regulates mitotic spindle organization and cell division. GPSM2 contains seven tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) and four Galpha(i/o)-Loco (GoLoco) motifs. GPSM2 has guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) activity towards both Galpha(o)- and(More)
GoLoco ('Galpha(i/o)-Loco' interaction) motif proteins have recently been identified as novel GDIs (guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) for heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunits. G18 is a member of the mammalian GoLoco-motif gene family and was uncovered by analyses of human and mouse genomes for anonymous open-reading frames. The encoded G18(More)
Introduct ion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Nitrogen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Sources of Nitrogen . . . . . . . . . . . .(More)