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A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, a methionine (Met) substitution for valine (Val) at codon 66 (Val66Met), is associated with alterations in brain anatomy and memory, but its relevance to clinical disorders is unclear. We generated a variant BDNF mouse (BDNF(Met/Met)) that reproduces the phenotypic(More)
Fragile X syndrome is the most prevalent cause of mental retardation. It is usually caused by the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene. Although the cognitive defect is the most recognized symptom of fragile X syndrome, patients also show behavioral problems such as hyperarousal, hyperactivity, autism, aggression, anxiety and increased sensitivity(More)
Fragile X syndrome is a common form of inherited mental retardation caused by the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). It has been hypothesized that FMRP is involved in the processing and/or translation of mRNAs. Human and mouse target-mRNAs, containing purine quartets, have previously been identified. By using cDNA-SELEX (systematic(More)
An involvement of serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors in the etiology of psychiatric disorders has been suggested. Hypo-responsiveness of the 5-HT1A receptor is linked to anxiety and constitutive deletion of the 5-HT1A receptor produces anxiety-like behaviors in the mouse. Evidence that 5-HT1A receptor inactivation increases the therapeutic effects of(More)
Brain serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in a number of physiological processes and pathological conditions. These effects are mediated by at least 14 different 5-HT receptors. We have inactivated the gene encoding the 5-HT1A receptor in mice and found that receptor-deficient animals have an increased tendency to avoid a novel and fearful environment and(More)
Atypical antipsychotics increase dopamine (DA) release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an effect possibly involved in the superior effects of atypical versus classical antipsychotics on cognitive/negative symptoms. We examined the role of 5-HT1A receptors in the mPFC on the modulation of dopaminergic activity and the mesocortical DA release in vivo.(More)
The prefrontal cortex plays a key role in the control of higher brain functions and is involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of schizophrenia. Here we report that approximately 60% of the neurons in rat and mouse prefrontal cortex express 5-HT(1A) and/or 5-HT2A receptor mRNAs, which are highly co-localized (approximately 80%). The electrical(More)
Selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in Humans. However, because only few animal models display overt anxious-like behavior, detailed preclinical studies of the anxiolytic properties of antidepressants are still lacking. Here, we studied the neurochemical and behavioral(More)
The activation peptide of mammalian trypsinogens contains a highly conserved tetra-aspartate sequence (D19-D20-D21-D22) preceding the K23-I24 scissile peptide bond, which is hydrolyzed as the first step in the activation process. Here, we examined the evolution and function of trypsinogen activation peptides through integrating functional characterization(More)
Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] neurotransmission in the central nervous system modulates depression and anxiety-related behaviors in humans and rodents, but the responsible downstream receptors remain poorly understood. We demonstrate that global disruption of 5-HT2A receptor (5HT2AR) signaling in mice reduces inhibition in conflict anxiety(More)