Mikhail Nesterenko

Learn More
Intrusion detection is a surveillance problem of practical import that is well suited to wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we study the application of sensor networks to the intrusion detection problem and the related problems of classifying and tracking targets. Our approach is based on a dense, distributed, wireless network of multi-modal(More)
The <i>Kansei</i> testbed at The Ohio State University is designed to facilitate research on networked sensing applications at scale. <i>Kansei</i> embodies a unique combination of characteristics as a result of its design focus on sensing and scaling: (i) Heterogeneous hardware infrastructure with dedicated node resources for local computation, storage,(More)
Project ExScal (for extreme scale) fielded a 1000+ node wireless sensor network and a 200+ node peer-to-peer ad hoc network of 802.11 devices in a 13km by 300m remote area in Florida, USA during December 2004. In comparison with previous deployments, the ExScal application is relatively complex and its networks are the largest ones of either type fielded to(More)
Hardware and software testbeds are becoming the preferred basis for experimenting with embedded wireless sensor network applications. The Kansei testbed at the Ohio State University features a heterogeneous hardware infrastructure, with dedicated node resources for local computation, storage, data retrieval, and back-channel communication. Kansei includes a(More)
Program refinements from an abstract to a concrete model empower designers to reason effectively in the abstract and architects to implement effectively in the concrete. For refinements to be useful, they must not only preserve functionality properties but also dependability properties. In this paper, we focus our attention on refinements that preserve the(More)
Secure location verification is a recently stated problem that has a number of practical applications. The problem requires a wireless sensor network to confirm that a potentially malicious prover is located in a designated area. The original solution to the problem, as well as solutions to related problems, exploits the difference between propagation(More)
We generalize the classic dining philosophers problem to separate the conflict and communication neighbors of each process. Communication neighbors may directly exchange information while conflict neighbors compete for the access to the exclusive critical section of code. This generalization is motivated by a number of practical problems in distributed(More)