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BACKGROUND Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are common in critically ill patients, even if they have not previously had diabetes. Whether the normalization of blood glucose levels with insulin therapy improves the prognosis for such patients is not known. METHODS We performed a prospective, randomized, controlled study involving adults admitted to our(More)
CONTEXT Although acute renal failure (ARF) is believed to be common in the setting of critical illness and is associated with a high risk of death, little is known about its epidemiology and outcome or how these vary in different regions of the world. OBJECTIVES To determine the period prevalence of ARF in intensive care unit (ICU) patients in multiple(More)
OBJECTIVES Maintenance of normoglycemia with insulin reduces mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. Here we report the factors determining insulin requirements and the impact of insulin dose vs. blood glucose control on the observed outcome benefits. DESIGN A prospective, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING A 56-bed predominantly surgical(More)
BACKGROUND Controversy exists about the timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition in critically ill adults in whom caloric targets cannot be met by enteral nutrition alone. METHODS In this randomized, multicenter trial, we compared early initiation of parenteral nutrition (European guidelines) with late initiation (American and Canadian guidelines)(More)
Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) improves the outcome of prolonged critically ill patients, but concerns remain regarding potential harm and the optimal blood glucose level. These questions were addressed using the pooled dataset of two randomized controlled trials. Independent of parenteral glucose load, IIT reduced mortality from 23.6 to 20.4% in the(More)
BACKGROUND Critically ill infants and children often develop hyperglycaemia, which is associated with adverse outcome; however, whether lowering blood glucose concentrations to age-adjusted normal fasting values improves outcome is unknown. We investigated the effect of targeting age-adjusted normoglycaemia with insulin infusion in critically ill infants(More)
Little information is available regarding current practice in continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) for the treatment of acute renal failure (ARF) and the possible clinical effect of practice variation. Prospective observational study. A total of 54 intensive care units (ICUs) in 23 countries. A cohort of 1006 ICU patients treated with CRRT for ARF.(More)
OBJECTIVE According to recent research, diuretics may increase mortality in acute renal failure patients. The administration of diuretics in such patients has been discouraged. Our objective was to determine the impact of diuretics on the mortality rate of critically ill patients with acute renal failure. DESIGN Prospective, multiple-center, multinational(More)
Sepsis is the most common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) in critical illness, but there is limited information on septic AKI. A prospective, observational study of critically ill patients with septic and nonseptic AKI was performed from September 2000 to December 2001 at 54 hospitals in 23 countries. A total of 1753 patients were enrolled. Sepsis was(More)
  • M Schetz
  • 1999
While there is clear support for the use of continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) in critically ill acute renal failure patients, there are other illnesses without renal involvement where CRRT might be of value. These include sepsis and other inflammatory syndromes such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and cardiopulmonary bypass where(More)