Michiel R. Fokkens

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We have recently identified missense mutations in prodynorphin (PDYN), the precursor to dynorphin opioid peptides, as the cause for spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA23) in Dutch ataxia cases. We report a screen of PDYN for mutations in 371 cerebellar ataxia cases, which had a positive family history; most are of French origin. Sequencing revealed three novel(More)
To the editor The autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are progressive neurodegenerative disorders caused by atrophy of the cerebellum leading to progressive ataxia of gait and limbs, and speech and eye movement difficulties [1]. The SCAs are genetically heterogeneous and 22 causal genes have already been identified [1, 2]. With the introduction of(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder of the cerebellum caused by mutations in the voltage gated potassium channel KCNC3. To identify novel pathogenic SCA13 mutations in KCNC3 and to gain insights into the disease prevalence in the Netherlands, we sequenced the entire coding region of KCNC3 in(More)
The dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by Purkinje cell loss in the cerebellum. Recently, we identified loss-of-function mutations in the KCND3 gene as the cause of spinocerebellar ataxia type 19/22 (SCA19/22), revealing a previously unknown role for the voltage-gated potassium channel,(More)
Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, a-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot(More)
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