Michelle Sardenberg-Hersh Tellez

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The minimum nurse-patient staffing legislation in California was fully implemented in 2004. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects on the minimum nurse-patient staffing legislation on the demographic, human capital, and work characteristics of the working RN population, focusing specifically on direct care nurses in the acute care setting. The(More)
California's minimum nurse-to-patient staffing ratio law, the nation's first, was implemented in 2004. This study had two aims: (a) to evaluate the effect of the nurse-to-patient ratios law on nurse job satisfaction in order to advance the debate over the merits of nurse staffing law, and (b) to compare California nurses who were satisfied against those who(More)
This study investigates the effect of the Recession of 2007 on nurses' wages, demographics, human capital, and work environment characteristics using data from the California Board of Registered Nursing Surveys of 2006, 2008 and 2010. Findings suggest that the labor force is maximized, with nurses working as much as they can on their primary nursing(More)
Using data from the 2004 California Board of Registered Nursing Survey, a two-stage least-square equation was estimated to examine the effect of wages on hours worked by female registered nurses. Wages were found to have a nonlinear effect on hours worked, with a backward bending supply curve. Wages had a positive effect on the average hours worked per week(More)
Using data from the California Board of Registered Nursing Surveys of 1997, 2004, 2006 and 2008, this study explores demographic, human capital, and work environment changes in the Hispanic RN population and compared these changes to those occurring among non-Hispanic Whites. Results find several significant differences between the two groups. The most(More)
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