Michelle M Giddens

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GPR37 (also known as Pael-R) and GPR37L1 are orphan G protein-coupled receptors that are almost exclusively expressed in the nervous system. We screened these receptors for potential activation by various orphan neuropeptides, and these screens yielded a single positive hit: prosaptide, which promoted the endocytosis of GPR37 and GPR37L1, bound to both(More)
Learning and memory deficits typify patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are generally attributed to medial temporal lobe dysfunction. Although the hippocampus is perhaps the most commonly studied neuroanatomical structure in these patients, there have been few attempts to identify rehabilitative interventions that facilitate its functioning.(More)
Complement protein D, a serine protease participating in the formation of the C3 convertase of the alternative complement pathway, has the lowest molecular weight (23,750) and serum concentration of all complement proteins. In normal serum, D is the rate-limiting protease of the alternative pathway of complement activation. We report that the serum(More)
Although Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Bipolar Disorder (BPD) frequently co-occur and represent a particularly morbid clinical form of both disorders, neuroimaging research addressing this comorbidity is scarce. Our aim was to evaluate cortical thickness in ADHD and BPD, testing the hypothesis that comorbid subjects (ADHD+BPD) would(More)
Prosaposin (also known as SGP-1) is an intriguing multifunctional protein that plays roles both intracellularly, as a regulator of lysosomal enzyme function, and extracellularly, as a secreted factor with neuroprotective and glioprotective effects. Following secretion, prosaposin can undergo endocytosis via an interaction with the low-density(More)
GPR37 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is predominantly expressed in the brain and found at particularly high levels in oligodendrocytes. GPR37 has been shown to exert effects on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination during development, but the molecular basis of these actions is incompletely understood and moreover nothing is known(More)
Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are disorders characterized by myoclonic and generalized seizures with progressive neurological deterioration. While several genetic causes for PMEs have been identified, the underlying causes remain unknown for a substantial portion of cases. Here we describe several affected individuals from a large, consanguineous(More)
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