Michelle Janssens

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A hallmark of atopic eczema (AE) is skin barrier dysfunction. Lipids in the stratum corneum (SC), primarily ceramides, fatty acids, and cholesterol, are crucial for the barrier function, but their role in relation to AE is indistinct. Filaggrin is an epithelial barrier protein with a central role in the pathogenesis of AE. Nevertheless, the precise causes(More)
BACKGROUND The barrier function of the skin is primarily provided by the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Skin barrier impairment is thought to be a primary factor in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema (AE). Filaggrin is an epidermal barrier protein and common mutations in the filaggrin gene strongly predispose for AE. However, the role(More)
The conformational disordering and lateral packing of lipids in porcine and human isolated stratum corneum (SC) was compared using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was shown that SC of both species differ markedly, porcine SC lipids being arranged predominantly in a hexagonal lattice while lipids in human SC are predominantly packed in the(More)
BACKGROUND Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) screening and contact precautions on patients at high risk for ESBL carriage are considered important infection control measures. Since contact precautions are costly and may negatively impact patient care, rapid exclusion of ESBL carriage and therefore earlier discontinuation of contact precautions are(More)
Skin barrier impairment is thought to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema (AE). The skin barrier is located in the stratum corneum (SC), consisting of corneocytes embedded in lipids. Ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids are the major lipid classes and are crucial for the skin barrier function, but their role in relation to AE(More)
An important feature of atopic eczema (AE) is a decreased skin barrier function. The stratum corneum (SC) lipids - comprised of ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol - fulfil a predominant role in the skin barrier function. In this clinical study, the carbon chain length distribution of SC lipids (FFAs and CERs) and their importance for(More)
Aldose reductase is an enzyme that plays an important role in diabetic complications such as cataract and neuropathy. The best way to estimate the enzymatic activity of this enzyme in vivo consists of measuring the accumulation of sorbitol or galactitol in various types of cells or tissues. A sensitive method to measure the polyols in biological samples by(More)
The barrier function of the skin is provided by the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin.Ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs) are present in SC and form highly ordered crystalline lipid lamellae. These lamellae are crucial for a proper skin barrier function. In the present study,Fourier transform infrared(More)
The skin protects the body from unwanted influences from the environment as well as excessive water loss. The barrier function of the skin is located in the stratum corneum (SC). The SC consists of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is crucial for the lipid skin barrier function. This paper provides an overview of the reported SC(More)