Michele K McKinney

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Endocannabinoids are lipid signaling molecules that regulate a wide range of mammalian behaviors, including pain, inflammation, and cognitive/emotional state. The endocannabinoid anandamide is principally degraded by the integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and there is currently much interest in developing FAAH inhibitors to augment(More)
Fatty acid amides constitute a large and diverse class of lipid transmitters that includes the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing substance oleamide. The magnitude and duration of fatty acid amide signaling are controlled by enzymatic hydrolysis in vivo. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity in mammals has been primarily(More)
Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a mammalian integral membrane enzyme that degrades the fatty acid amide family of endogenous signaling lipids, which includes the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing substance oleamide. FAAH belongs to a large and diverse class of enzymes referred to as the amidase signature (AS) family.(More)
Chemical signals, or neurotransmitters, represent the fundamental mode for intercellular communication in the nervous system. The classical model for neurotransmitter action involves the uptake and storage of these small molecules into synaptic vesicles, release of vesicular contents into the synaptic cleft in response to depolarization of the presynaptic(More)
Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is a mammalian amidase signature enzyme that inactivates neuromodulatory fatty acid amides, including the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide and the sleep-inducing substance oleamide. The recent determination of the three-dimensional structures of FAAH and two distantly related bacterial amidase signature enzymes indicates(More)
Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an integral membrane enzyme that catabolizes several bioactive lipids in vivo. Most of the physiological substrates of FAAH characterized to date belong to the N-acyl ethanolamine (NAE) class of fatty acid amides, including the endocannabinoid anandamide, the anti-inflammatory lipid N-palmitoyl ethanolamine, and the(More)
The potent regulatory properties of NKT cells render this subset of lipid-specific T cells a promising target for immunotherapeutic interventions. The marine sponge glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer) is the proto-typic NKT cell agonist, which elicits this function when bound to CD1d. However, our understanding of the in vivo properties of NKT(More)
Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) is an integral membrane enzyme that degrades the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and several other bioactive lipid amides. The catalytic mechanism of FAAH has been largely elucidated, and structural models of the enzyme suggest that it may recruit its hydrophobic substrates directly from the lipid bilayer of the cell.(More)
Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inactivates a large and diverse class of endogenous signaling lipids termed fatty acid amides. Representative fatty acid amides include the N-acyl ethanolamines (NAEs) anandamide, which serves as an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptors, and N-oleoyl and N-palmitoyl ethanolamine, which produce satiety and(More)
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