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Separating the Shirkers from the Workers? Making Sure Respondents Pay Attention on Self‐Administered Surveys
Good survey and experimental research requires subjects to pay attention to questions and treatments, but many subjects do not. In this article, we discuss “Screeners” as a potential solution to thisExpand
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THE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF UNINFORMED VOTERS
Americans fail to meet the democratic ideal of an informed electorate, and the consequences of this political ignorance are a topic of significant scholarly debate. In two independent settings, weExpand
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From Politics to the Pews: How Partisanship and the Political Environment Shape Religious Identity
Do the religious convictions of Americans explain the so-called “God gap,” the sorting that leads the devout and the unaffiliated to their separate homes in the Republican and Democratic parties,Expand
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Who Really Gives? Partisanship and Charitable Giving in the United States
Voluntary contributions from individuals are the lifeblood of nonprofit organizations, which in turn fund a large portion of social services in the United States. Given this reliance donorExpand
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Can we turn shirkers into workers
Abstract Survey researchers increasingly employ attention checks to identify inattentive respondents and reduce noise. Once inattentive respondents are identified, however, researchers must decideExpand
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Using screeners to measure respondent attention on self-administered surveys: Which items and how many?
Inattentive respondents introduce noise into data sets, weakening correlations between items and increasing the likelihood of null findings. “Screeners” have been proposed as a way to identifyExpand
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Missing voices: polling and health care.
Examining data on the recent health care legislation, we demonstrate that public opinion polls on health care should be treated with caution because of item nonresponse--or "don't know" answers--onExpand
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Partisan Differences in Nonpartisan Activity: The Case of Charitable Giving
How do political identities shape seemingly non-political behaviors, such as consumption activity? This paper explores the extent to which political divisions impact apolitical behaviors, focusing onExpand
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Implicit Cue-Taking in Elections
Can implicit racial cues change voters’ perceptions about a candidate’s race, and even change their support for a candidate? The results from a recent local election, in which a white conservativeExpand
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The Political Consequences of Uninformed Voters
Survey researchers have long known that Americans fail to meet the democratic ideals of an informed electorate. The consequences of this political ignorance, however, are less clear. In twoExpand
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