Michel Ferrand-Drake

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The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is an inducer of cell death. During the reperfusion phase after cerebral ischemia, calcium accumulates in mitochondria, and a burst of free radical formation occurs, conditions that favor the activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Here the authors demonstrate that a blocker of the(More)
Mitochondria are known to be involved in the early stage of apoptosis by releasing cytochrome c, caspase-9, and the second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac). We have reported that overexpression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) reduced superoxide production and ameliorated neuronal injury in the hippocampal CA1 subregion after(More)
Induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) has been implicated in cellular apoptosis and in ischemia-reperfusion injury. During MPT, a channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane, the mitochondrial megachannel, opens and causes isolated mitochondria to swell. MPT and mitochondrial swelling is inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA), which may(More)
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which plays a role in apoptosis, is susceptible to oxidative stress. Because superoxide is produced in the brain after ischemia/reperfusion, oxidative injury to this organelle may be implicated in ischemic neuronal cell death. Activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), both of which are(More)
The Akt signaling pathway contributes to regulation of apoptosis after a variety of cell death stimuli. A novel proline-rich Akt substrate (PRAS) was recently detected and found to be involved in apoptosis. In our study, Akt activation was modulated by growth factors, and treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF) reduced apoptotic cell death after ischemic(More)
Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is implicated in neuronal degeneration in some situations, its role in delayed neuronal cell death (DND) after ischemia remains uncertain. The authors speculated that ER stress is involved in DND, that it is reduced by ischemic preconditioning, and that ER stress reduction by preconditioning is due to ER molecular(More)
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which plays important roles in apoptosis, is susceptible to oxidative stress. Because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are robustly produced in the ischemic brain, ER damage by ROS may be implicated in ischemic neuronal cell death. We induced global brain ischemia on wild-type and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1)(More)
The Bad signaling pathway contributes to the regulation of apoptosis after a variety of cell death stimuli, and Bad plays a key role in determining cell death or survival. We have reported that overexpression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) reduces apoptotic cell death after transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI). However, both the role of the(More)
The time-course of DNA fragmentation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the choroid plexus was studied following induction of transient forebrain ischemia under lethal normothermic (37 degrees C), or sublethal hypothermic (33 degrees C) conditions. Oligonucleosomal- and high-molecular-weight DNA fragmentation were analysed by conventional agarose gel(More)
Following a complete disruption of blood flow to the brain, cerebral ischemia, a specific neuronal population, namely the CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus, will die a delayed type of cell death. This is often referred to as "delayed neuronal death" (DND). It is not known why it takes around 48 hours for these cells to die. It is very often(More)