Michel Félétou

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Endothelial cells synthesize and release vasoactive mediators in response to various neurohumoural substances (e.g. bradykinin or acetylcholine) and physical stimuli (e.g. cyclic stretch or fluid shear stress). The best-characterized endothelium-derived relaxing factors are nitric oxide and prostacyclin. However, an additional relaxant pathway associated(More)
Endothelial cells synthesize and release various factors that regulate angiogenesis, inflammatory responses, hemostasis, as well as vascular tone and permeability. Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with a number of pathophysiological processes. Oxidative stress appears to be a common denominator underlying endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular(More)
The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin but also by other pathways causing hyperpolarization of the underlying smooth muscle cells. This characteristic was at the origin of the denomination endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). We know now that this acronym includes different mechanisms.(More)
The term endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF) was introduced in 1987 to describe the hypothetical factor responsible for myocyte hyperpolarisations not associated with nitric oxide (EDRF) or prostacyclin. Two broad categories of EDHF response exist. The classical EDHF pathway is blocked by apamin plus TRAM-34 but not by apamin plus iberiotoxin(More)
In the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and aging Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), acetylcholine releases an endothelium-derived contracting factor (EDCF) produced by endothelial cyclooxygenase-1, which stimulates thromboxane A2 receptors (TP receptors) on vascular smooth muscle. The purpose of the present study was to identify this EDCF by measuring changes in(More)
The endothelium controls vascular tone not only by releasing NO and prostacyclin, but also by other pathways causing hyperpolarization of the underlying smooth muscle cells. This characteristic was at the origin of the term 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor' (EDHF). However, this acronym includes different mechanisms. Arachidonic acid metabolites(More)
Endothelium-dependent contractions contribute to endothelial dysfunction in various animal models of aging, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. In the spontaneously hypertensive rat, the archetypal model for endothelium-dependent contractions, the production of the endothelium-derived contractile factors (EDCF) involves an increase in endothelial(More)
1. Endothelial cells, under given circumstances, can initiate contraction (constriction) of the vascular smooth muscle cells that surround them. Such endothelium-dependent, acute increases in contractile tone can be due to the withdrawal of the production of nitric oxide, to the production of vasoconstrictor peptides (angiotensin II, endothelin-1), to the(More)
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Experiments were designed to assess whether or not the intracellular concentration of calcium and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase in endothelial cells of the rat thoracic aorta in response to releasers of endothelium-derived contracting factor (EDCF) and if so, whether or not a difference exists between spontaneously(More)
The three subtypes of calcium-activated potassium channels (K(Ca)) of large, intermediate and small conductance (BK(Ca), IK(Ca) and SK(Ca)) are present in the vascular wall. In healthy arteries, BK(Ca) channels are preferentially expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells, while IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) are preferentially located in endothelial cells. The(More)