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The objective of the present study was to investigate the relative contribution of the convective heat transfer in the forearm and hand to 1) the total heat loss during partial immersion in cold water [water temperature (Tw) = 20 degrees C] and 2) the heat gained during partial immersion in warm water (Tw = 38 degrees C). The heat fluxes from the skin of(More)
BACKGROUND Exposure of the fingers to severe cold leads to cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD). The influence of ambient temperature on the CIVD-response is well understood and documented, but the response of CIVD to hyperthermia and mild hypothermia has rarely been investigated. METHODS To investigate the influence of body thermal status on the CIVD(More)
The aim of this study was to use whole body calorimetry to directly measure the change in body heat content (DeltaH(b)) during steady-state exercise and compare these values with those estimated using thermometry. The thermometry models tested were the traditional two-compartment model of "core" and "shell" temperatures, and a three-compartment model of(More)
Seven subjects (1 woman) performed an incremental isotonic test on a Kin-Com isokinetic apparatus to determine their maximal oxygen consumption during bilateral knee extensions (Vo(2 sp)). A multisensor thermal probe was inserted into the left vastus medialis (middiaphysis) under ultrasound guidance. The deepest sensor (tip) was located approximately 10 mm(More)
The relationship between body temperature and the hunting response (intermittent supply of warm blood to cold exposed extremities) was quantified for nine subjects by immersing one hand in 8 degree C water while their body was either warm, cool or comfortable. Core and skin temperatures were manipulated by exposing the subjects to different ambient(More)
Changes in mean body temperature (DeltaT(b)) estimated by the traditional two-compartment model of "core" and "shell" temperatures and an adjusted two-compartment model incorporating a correction factor were compared with values derived by whole body calorimetry. Sixty participants (31 men, 29 women) cycled at 40% of peak O(2) consumption for 60 or 90 min(More)
PURPOSE Previous studies have shown a rapid reduction in postexercise local sweating and blood flow despite elevated core temperatures. However, local heat loss responses do not illustrate how much whole-body heat dissipation is reduced, and core temperature measurements do not accurately represent the magnitude of residual body heat storage. Whole-body(More)
This study compared the effect of repetitive work in thermoneutral and cold conditions on forearm muscle electromyogram (EMG) and fatigue. We hypothesize that cold and repetitive work together cause higher EMG activity and fatigue than repetitive work only, thus creating a higher risk for overuse injuries. Eight men performed six 20-min work bouts at 25(More)
This study evaluated the effect of body adiposity on core cooling rates, as measured by decreases in rectal (T (re)), esophageal (T (es)) and aural canal (T (ac)) temperatures, of individuals rendered hyperthermic by dynamic exercise in the heat. Seventeen male participants were divided into two groups; low body fat (LF, 12.9 +/- 1.9%) and high body fat(More)
PURPOSE The aim of this study was to investigate heat balance during thermal transients caused by successive exercise bouts. Whole-body heat loss (H x L) and changes in body heat content (Delta Hb) were measured using simultaneous direct whole-body and indirect calorimetry. METHODS Ten participants performed three successive bouts of 30-min cycling (Ex1,(More)