Learn More
Here we provide a genome-wide, high-resolution map of the phylogenetic origin of the genome of most extant laboratory mouse inbred strains. Our analysis is based on the genotypes of wild-caught mice from three subspecies of Mus musculus. We show that classical laboratory strains are derived from a few fancy mice with limited haplotype diversity. Their(More)
Patterns of genetic differentiation among taxa at early stages of divergence provide an opportunity to make inferences about the history of speciation. Here, we conduct a survey of DNA-sequence polymorphism and divergence at loci on the autosomes, X chromosome, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA in samples of Mus domesticus, M. musculus and M. castaneus. We(More)
Speciation is a fundamental evolutionary process, the knowledge of which is crucial for understanding the origins of biodiversity. Genomic approaches are an increasingly important aspect of this research field. We review current understanding of genome-wide effects of accumulating reproductive isolation and of genomic properties that influence the process(More)
In the early stages of reproductive isolation, genomic regions of reduced recombination are expected to show greater levels of differentiation, either because gene flow between species is reduced in these regions or because the effects of selection at linked sites within species are enhanced in these regions. Here, we study the patterns of DNA sequence(More)
The house mouse is a well-established model organism, particularly for studying the genetics of complex traits. However, most studies of mice use classical inbred strains, whose genomes derive from multiple species. Relatively little is known about the distribution of genetic variation among these species or how variation among strains relates to variation(More)
Levels of heterozygosity for single nucleotide polymorphisms vary by more than one order of magnitude in different regions of the human genome. Regional differences in the rate of recombination explain a substantial fraction of the variation in levels of nucleotide polymorphism, consistent with the widespread action of natural selection at the molecular(More)
Frequent positive selection is a hallmark of genes involved in the adaptive immune system of vertebrates, but the incidence of positive selection for genes underlying innate immunity in vertebrates has not been well studied. The toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system represent the first line of defense against pathogens. TLRs lie directly at(More)
Elucidating genetic mechanisms of adaptation is a goal of central importance in evolutionary biology, yet few empirical studies have succeeded in documenting causal links between molecular variation and organismal fitness in natural populations. Here we report a population genetic analysis of a two-locus alpha-globin polymorphism that underlies(More)