Michael Upp

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This article examines and compares the survival rates of persons claiming retired-worker benefits at age 62 with those who did not. The study is based on a sample of Social Security insured workers who reached age 62 during the period 1962-72. The proportion of men dying in the initial years after age 62 was higher among those who claimed benefits at age 62(More)
This article reports on a study undertaken to evaluate the Social Security Administration's (SSA) methods for estimating the number of persons eligible for Federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments. SSA estimates that 65-70 percent of the aged eligible for SSI actually participate in the program. It has been argued that the actual participation(More)
  • M Upp
  • 1982
A Look at the Economic Status of the Aged Then and Now* With this issue, the Social Security Bulletin commences its 45th year of publication. Writing in volume 1, numbers l-3 in the March 1938 issue, Social Security Board Chairman Arthur J. Altmeyer-one of the chief technical architects of the Social Security Act-expressed his hope that the Bulletin would(More)
This article, a reprint of a paper presented in 1988 to the International Social Security Association, traces the debate from 1970 through 1988 over treatment of women in the Social Security system. It traces issues relating to working women, couples with two earners, homemakers, widows, and divorced women. It describes the debate that led to widespread(More)
  • M Upp
  • 1983
This article looks at the extent to which aged couples and nonmarried persons rely on earnings, retirement pensions, assets, and public assistance. The study notes the importance of these various sources to aged units with different levels of both total money income and retirement income, then examines changes in the relative importance of the different(More)
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