Michael Schwake

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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study represents a novel characterisation of KCNQ-encoded potassium channels in the vasculature using a variety of pharmacological and molecular tools to determine their role in contractility. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments were undertaken on RNA isolated from mouse(More)
Dent's disease is an X-linked disorder associated with the urinary loss of low-molecular-weight proteins, phosphate and calcium, which often leads to kidney stones. It is caused by mutations in ClC-5, a renal chloride channel that is expressed in endosomes of the proximal tubule. Here we show that disruption of the mouse clcn5 gene causes proteinuria by(More)
Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike and waves during slow-wave(More)
Beta-secretase (BACE1) is the rate-limiting protease for the generation of the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) in Alzheimer disease. Mice in which the bace1 gene is inactivated are reported to be healthy. However, the presence of a homologous gene encoding BACE2 raises the possibility of compensatory mechanisms. Therefore, we have generated bace1, bace2, and(More)
beta-glucocerebrosidase, the enzyme defective in Gaucher disease, is targeted to the lysosome independently of the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. Affinity-chromatography experiments revealed that the lysosomal integral membrane protein LIMP-2 is a specific binding partner of beta-glucocerebrosidase. This interaction involves a coiled-coil domain within the(More)
Epilepsy is caused by an electrical hyperexcitability in the CNS. Because K+ channels are critical for establishing and stabilizing the resting potential of neurons, a loss of K+ channels could support neuronal hyperexcitability. Indeed, benign familial neonatal convulsions, an autosomal dominant epilepsy of infancy, is caused by mutations in KCNQ2 or KCNQ3(More)
Mutations in KCNQ K(+) channel genes underlie several human pathologies. KCNQ alpha-subunits form either homotetramers or hetero-oligomers with a restricted subset of other KCNQ alpha-subunits or with KCNE beta-subunits. KCNQ1 assembles with KCNE beta-subunits but not with other KCNQ alpha-subunits. By contrast, KCNQ3 interacts with KCNQ2, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5.(More)
The ability of KCNQ (Kv7) channels to form hetero-oligomers is of high physiological importance, because heteromers of KCNQ3 with KCNQ2 or KCNQ5 underlie the neuronal M-current, which modulates neuronal excitability. In KCNQ channels, we recently identified a C-terminal subunit interaction (si) domain that determines their subunit-specific assembly. Within(More)
Mutations in either KCNQ2 or KCNQ3 underlie benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), an inherited epilepsy. The corresponding proteins are co-expressed in broad regions of the brain and associate to heteromeric K(+) channels. These channels mediate M-type currents that regulate neuronal excitability. We investigated the basis for the increase in(More)
The ClC-5 chloride channel resides mainly in vesicles of the endocytotic pathway and contributes to their acidification. Its disruption in mice entails a broad defect in renal endocytosis and causes secondary changes in calciotropic hormone levels. Inactivating mutations in Dent's disease lead to proteinuria and kidney stones. Possibly by recycling, a small(More)