Michael Rogers

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Bisphosphonates are currently the most important class of antiresorptive drugs used for the treatment of metabolic bone diseases. Although the molecular targets of bisphosphonates have not been identified, these compounds inhibit bone resorption by mechanisms that can lead to osteoclast apoptosis. Bisphosphonates also induce apoptosis in mouse J774(More)
BACKGROUND Bisphosphonates currently are the most important class of antiresorptive agents used in the treatment of metabolic bone diseases, including tumor-associated osteolysis and hypercalcemia, Paget's disease, and osteoporosis. These compounds have high affinity for calcium and therefore target to bone mineral, where they appear to be internalized(More)
CRAFT Research Center, 419 N. Indiana Avenue, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA Department of Anthropology, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT 06515-1355, USA Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge Road, Berkeley, CA 94709, USA(More)
This review describes the key discoveries over the last 15 years that have led to a clearer understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which bisphosphonate drugs inhibit bone resorption. Once released from bone mineral surfaces during bone resorption, these agents accumulate intracellularly in osteoclasts. Simple bisphosphonates such as clodronate are(More)
It has long been known that small changes to the structure of the R(2) side chain of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates can dramatically affect their potency for inhibiting bone resorption in vitro and in vivo, although the reason for these differences in antiresorptive potency have not been explained at the level of a pharmacological target. Recently,(More)
GPR55 is a G protein-coupled receptor recently shown to be activated by certain cannabinoids and by lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). However, the physiological role of GPR55 remains unknown. Given the recent finding that the cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) affect bone metabolism, we examined the role of GPR55 in bone biology. GPR55 was expressed in(More)
PURPOSE Bisphosphonates are currently the most important class of antiresorptive agents used in the treatment of metabolic bone diseases, including tumor-associated osteolysis and hypercalcemia. These compounds have high affinity for calcium ions and therefore target bone mineral, where they are internalized by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and inhibit(More)
Comparative biomolecular studies suggest that the last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, our closest living relatives, lived during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene. Fossil evidence of Late Miocene-Early Pliocene hominid evolution is rare and limited to a few sites in Ethiopia, Kenya and Chad. Here we report new Early Pliocene hominid discoveries(More)
Fluvio-lacustrine sediments of the Hadar and Busidima Formations along the northern Awash River (Ethiopia) archive almost three million years (3.4 to <0.6 Ma) of human evolution, including the earliest documented record of stone toolmaking at 2.5–2.6 Ma. This paper brings together sedimentologic and isotopic evidence for the paleoenvironmental context of(More)
Bisphosphonates (BPs) used as inhibitors of bone resorption all contain two phosphonate groups attached to a single carbon atom, forming a "P-C-P" structure. The bisphosphonates are therefore stable analogues of naturally occuring pyrophosphate-containing compounds, which now helps to explain their intracellular as well as their extracellular modes of(More)