Michael Rethfeldt

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The term Internet of Things (IoT) describes a scenario where embedded systems are integrated into everyday objects, turning them into smart devices to assist the user in his everyday life. Each of these smart objects only offers a very limited amount of computational power since it is only specialized in a limited set of tasks. In order to achieve complex(More)
The broad availability of WLAN-capable off-the-shelf hardware lets WLAN mesh networks appear as promising technology for future distributed wireless applications. Featuring automatic device discovery, interconnection and routing, they provide a higher scalability, flexibility, and robustness compared to common centralized WLAN infrastructures. Besides these(More)
In the recent past, the development of applications and protocols for the Internet of Things (IoT) made a big leap forward. New approaches have emerged to adopt IoT technologies in the realm of industrial automation. This development is also referred to as Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) or Industry 4.0. It is predicted for the number of smart(More)
The new standard IEEE 802.11s enables vendor-independent wireless mesh networks based on the 802.11 WLAN technology. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is the most widespread transport protocol for reliable data delivery and still the basis for many network applications. TCP supports different mechanisms for flow and congestion control. However, designed(More)
The new standard amendment IEEE 802.11s enables low-level interoperability for future WLAN mesh networks. Support of the Hybrid Wireless Mesh Protocol (HWMP) and the Airtime Link Metric (ALM) for MAC-layer routing is mandatory. Its default distance vector routing mode facilitates scalability but also results in a limited network view per mesh node.(More)
WLAN mesh networks are characterized by their flexible and low-cost deployment, scalability, and self-healing capabilities. The new WLAN standard IEEE 802.11s introduces low-level mesh interoperability. However, building large-scale real-world test beds and reproducible setups is challenging and costly. In the majority of research works, network simulation(More)
Adopted in late 2011, IEEE 802.11s comes as the first industry standard to enable vendor-independent and inter-operable WLAN mesh networks. Featuring automatic device interconnection and routing, they provide a higher scalability, flexibility, and robustness compared to common centralized WLAN infrastructures. The 802.11s standard defines mandatory support(More)
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