Michael R. Brudzinski

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The two largest earthquakes of the past 40 years ruptured a 1600-kilometer-long portion of the fault boundary between the Indo-Australian and southeastern Eurasian plates on 26 December 2004 [seismic moment magnitude (Mw) = 9.1 to 9.3] and 28 March 2005 (Mw = 8.6). The first event generated a tsunami that caused more than 283,000 deaths. Fault slip of up to(More)
a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Cascadia tomography segmentation episodic tremor and slip arc volcanism subduction zone structure Along strike variation in the characteristics of subduction zone processes has been observed throughout the Cascadia Subduction Zone through magmas analysis of arc magmas and the distribution of seismicity. We investigate links(More)
In this section, we discuss the relevant information for identification of slow slip episodes, with additional details presented elsewhere (Holtkamp et al., 2006, ms. in prep.). The GPS data analyzed for slow slip episodes is from the PANGA network provided by the Central Washington University clearinghouse (2005). PANGA time series are network solutions(More)
Great earthquakes have repeatedly occurred on the plate interface in a few shallow-dipping subduction zones where the subducting and overriding plates are strongly locked. Silent earthquakes (or slow slip events) were recently discovered at the down-dip extension of the locked zone and interact with the earthquake cycle. Here, we show that locally observed(More)
[1] Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events in subduction zones occur in the general vicinity of the plate boundary, downdip of the locked zone. In developing an understanding of the ETS phenomenon it is important to relate the spatial occurrence of nonvolcanic tremor to the principal structural elements within the subduction complex. In Cascadia, active and(More)
a r t i c l e i n f o Keywords: Cascadia subduction Mendocino Triple Junction Gorda-Juan de Fuca plate slab edge shear wave splitting Mantle flow associated with the Cascadia subduction zone and the Mendocino Triple Junction is poorly characterized due to a lack of shear wave splitting studies compared to other subduction zones. To fill this gap data was(More)
Double Benioff zones provide opportunities for insight into seismogenesis because the underlying mechanism must explain two layers of deep earthquakes and the separation between them. We characterize layer separation inside subducting plates with a coordinate rotation to calculate the slab-normal distribution of earthquakes. Benchmark tests on(More)
Strong evidence exists that water is carried from the surface into the upper mantle by hydrous minerals in the uppermost 10-12 km of subducting lithosphere, and more water may be added as the lithosphere bends and goes downwards. Significant amounts of that water are released as the lithosphere heats up, triggering earthquakes and fluxing arc volcanism. In(More)
Using waveforms and travel times from deep earthquakes, we constructed 16 seismic profiles, each of which constrains the radial variation in Vp over a small area beneath the northern Philippine Sea. Taken together, the azimuthal coverage of these profiles also places tight bounds on the lateral extent of a region of anomalously high Vp (up to 3% faster than(More)
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