Michael Jeltsch

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Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is a major regulator of blood vessel formation and function. It controls several processes in endothelial cells, such as proliferation, survival, and migration, but it is not known how these are coordinately regulated to result in more complex morphogenetic events, such as tubular sprouting, fusion, and network(More)
We have identified a member of the VEGF family by computer-based homology searching and have designated it VEGF-D. VEGF-D is most closely related to VEGF-C by virtue of the presence of N- and C-terminal extensions that are not found in other VEGF family members. In adult human tissues, VEGF-D mRNA is most abundant in heart, lung, skeletal muscle, colon, and(More)
The recently identified vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) belongs to the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/VEGF family of growth factors and is a ligand for the endothelial-specific receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-3 and VEGFR-2. The VEGF homology domain spans only about one-third of the cysteine-rich VEGF-C precursor. Here we have analysed(More)
Lymphatic vessels are essential for immune surveillance, tissue fluid homeostasis and fat absorption. Defects in lymphatic vessel formation or function cause lymphedema. Here we show that the vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) is required for the initial steps in lymphatic development. In Vegfc−/− mice, endothelial cells commit to the lymphatic(More)
The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family has recently expanded by the identification and cloning of three additional members, namely VEGF-B, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D. In this study we demonstrate that VEGF-B binds selectively to VEGF receptor-1/Flt-1. This binding can be blocked by excess VEGF, indicating that the interaction sites on the receptor are(More)
Edema occurs in asthma and other inflammatory diseases when the rate of plasma leakage from blood vessels exceeds the drainage through lymphatic vessels and other routes. It is unclear to what extent lymphatic vessels grow to compensate for increased leakage during inflammation and what drives the lymphangiogenesis that does occur. We addressed these issues(More)
No growth factors specific for the lymphatic vascular system have yet been described. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates vascular permeability and angiogenesis, but does not promote lymphangiogenesis. Overexpression of VEGF-C, a ligand of the VEGF receptors VEGFR-3 and VEGFR-2, in the skin of transgenic mice resulted in lymphatic, but not(More)
Lymphatic vascular development is regulated by vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3), which is activated by its ligands VEGF-C and VEGF-D. Neuropilin-2 (NP2), known to be involved in neuronal development, has also been implicated to play a role in lymphangiogenesis. We aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which NP2 is involved in lymphatic(More)
Metastasis is a frequent and lethal complication of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is a recently described lymphangiogenic factor. Increased expression of VEGF-C in primary tumours correlates with dissemination of tumour cells to regional lymph nodes. However, a direct role for VEGF-C in tumour lymphangiogenesis and subsequent(More)
Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) has an essential role in the development of embryonic blood vessels; however, after midgestation its expression becomes restricted mainly to the developing lymphatic vessels. The VEGFR-3 ligand VEGF-C stimulates lymphangiogenesis in transgenic mice and in chick chorioallantoic membrane. As VEGF-C also(More)