Michael J. Lush

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The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is the most important region in the vertebrate genome with respect to infection and autoimmunity, and is crucial in adaptive and innate immunity. Decades of biomedical research have revealed many MHC genes that are duplicated, polymorphic and associated with more diseases than any other region of the human genome.(More)
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) aims to assign a unique and ideally meaningful name and symbol to every human gene. The HGNC database currently comprises over 24 000 public records containing approved human gene nomenclature and associated gene information. Following our recent relocation to the European Bioinformatics Institute our homepage can(More)
The need for standard nomenclature in human genetics was recognised as early as the 1960s, and in 1979 full guidelines for human gene nomenclature were presented at the Edinburgh Human Genome Meeting (HGM) and subsequently published (Shows et al. 1979). The current Chair of the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee, Sue Povey, was elected at the HGM meeting in(More)
Genew, the Human Gene Nomenclature Database http://www.gene.ucl.ac.uk/cgi-bin/nomenclature/searchgenes.pl is the only resource that provides data for all human genes that have approved symbols. It is managed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) as a confidential database, containing over 22 000 records, 75% of which are represented online by a(More)
The N-terminal amino acid sequences of proteolytic fragments of neuropathy target esterase (NTE), covalently labelled on its active-site serine by a biotinylated organophosphorus ester, were determined and used to deduce the location of this serine residue and to initiate cloning of its cDNA. A putative NTE clone, isolated from a human foetal brain cDNA(More)
BioMart Central Portal is a first of its kind, community-driven effort to provide unified access to dozens of biological databases spanning genomics, proteomics, model organisms, cancer data, ontology information and more. Anybody can contribute an independently maintained resource to the Central Portal, allowing it to be exposed to and shared with the(More)
Guidelines for human gene nomenclature were first published in 1979 [1], when the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee was first given the authority to approve and implement human gene names and symbols. Updates of these guidelines were published in 1987 [2], 1995 [3], and 1997 [4]. With the recent publications of the complete human genome sequence there is an(More)
Genew, the Human Gene Nomenclature Database, is the only resource that provides data for all human genes which have approved symbols. It is managed by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) as a confidential database, containing over 16 000 records, 80% of which are represented on the Web by searchable text files. The data in Genew are highly curated(More)
The reference sequence for each human chromosome provides the framework for understanding genome function, variation and evolution. Here we report the finished sequence and biological annotation of human chromosome 1. Chromosome 1 is gene-dense, with 3,141 genes and 991 pseudogenes, and many coding sequences overlap. Rearrangements and mutations of(More)
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) aims to assign a unique gene symbol and name to every human gene. The HGNC database currently contains almost 30,000 approved gene symbols, over 19,000 of which represent protein-coding genes. The public website, www.genenames.org, displays all approved nomenclature within Symbol Reports that contain data curated(More)