• Publications
  • Influence
Development and validation of the Delaying Gratification Inventory.
Deficits in gratification delay are associated with a broad range of public health problems, such as obesity, risky sexual behavior, and substance abuse. However, 6 decades of research on theExpand
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Participant Dropout as a Function of Survey Length in Internet-Mediated University Studies: Implications for Study Design and Voluntary Participation in Psychological Research
  • Michael Hoerger
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Cyberpsychology Behav. Soc. Netw.
  • 13 December 2010
TLDR
Internet-based psychology studies often involve undergraduates completing lengthy and time-consuming batteries of online personality questionnaires, but no known published studies to date have closely examined the natural course of participant dropout during attempted completion of them. Expand
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Emotional benefits of mindfulness-based stress reduction in older adults: the moderating roles of age and depressive symptom severity
Objectives: To examine the effects of age and depressive symptom severity on changes in positive affect among older adults randomly assigned to a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program orExpand
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Parental Child-Rearing Strategies Influence Self-Regulation, Socio-Emotional Adjustment, and Psychopathology in Early Adulthood: Evidence from a Retrospective Cohort Study.
This study examined the association between recollected parental child-rearing strategies and individual differences in self-regulation, socio-emotional adjustment, and psychopathology in earlyExpand
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Toward identifying the effects of the specific components of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction on biologic and emotional outcomes among older adults.
OBJECTIVES The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of specific Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) activities (yoga, sitting and informal meditation, body scan) on immuneExpand
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Affective forecasting and self-rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and hypomania: Evidence for a dysphoric forecasting bias
Emerging research has examined individual differences in affective forecasting; however, we are aware of no published study to date linking psychopathology symptoms to affective forecasting problems.Expand
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Affective forecasting and the Big Five.
Recent studies on affective forecasting clarify that the emotional reactions people anticipate often differ markedly from those they actually experience in response to affective stimuli and events.Expand
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Values and options in cancer care (VOICE): study design and rationale for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for physicians, patients with advanced cancer, and their
BackgroundCommunication about prognosis and treatment choices is essential for informed decision making in advanced cancer. This article describes an investigation designed to facilitateExpand
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When does haste make waste? Speed-accuracy tradeoff, skill level, and the tools of the trade.
TLDR
Novice and skilled golfers took a series of golf putts with a standard putter (Exp. 1) or a distorted funny putt (consisting of an s-shaped and arbitrarily weighted putter shaft; Exp. 2) under instructions to either (a) take as much time as needed to be accurate or to (b) putt as fast as possible. Planning and movement time were measured for each putt. Expand
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Cognitive determinants of affective forecasting errors.
Often to the detriment of human decision making, people are prone to an impact bias when making affective forecasts, overestimating the emotional consequences of future events. The cognitiveExpand
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