Michael H. Tatham

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The covalent attachment of the protein ubiquitin to intracellular proteins by a process known as ubiquitylation regulates almost all major cellular systems, predominantly by regulating protein turnover. Ubiquitylation requires the co-ordinated action of three enzymes termed E1, E2 and E3, and typically results in the formation of an isopeptide bond between(More)
Dimeric RING E3 ligases interact with protein substrates and conformationally restrain the ubiquitin-E2-conjugating enzyme thioester complex such that it is primed for catalysis. RNF4 is an E3 ligase containing an N-terminal domain that binds its polySUMO substrates and a C-terminal RING domain responsible for dimerization. To investigate how RNF4 activity(More)
The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Proteins to be degraded are conjugated to ubiquitin chains that act as recognition signals for the 26S proteasome. The proteasome subunits Rpn10 and Rpn13 are known to bind ubiquitin, but genetic and biochemical data suggest the existence of at least one other(More)
Dynamic nuclear SUMO modifications play essential roles in orchestrating cellular responses to proteotoxic stress, DNA damage, and DNA virus infection. Here, we describe a non-canonical host SUMOylation response to the nuclear-replicating RNA pathogen, influenza virus, and identify viral RNA polymerase activity as a major contributor to SUMO proteome(More)
Modification of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) occurs through a variety of topologically distinct Ub linkages, including Ube2W-mediated monoubiquitylation of N-terminal alpha amines to generate peptide-linked linear mono-Ub fusions. Protein ubiquitylation can be reversed by the action of deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), many of which show striking preference(More)
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