Michael G. LaCelle

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From our way of thinking the problem facing vaccine strategies for cancer is not that we do not have "enough" tumour antigens. The problem is we cannot induce an immune response that is sufficient to mediate tumour regression. The normal "checks and balances" found in the body prevent the sustained expansion and subsequent persistence of immune killer(More)
Since multiple lines of experimental and clinical data clearly identified regulatory T cells as an integral part of the immune response, these cells have become a major focus of investigation in tumor immunology. Regulatory T cells are in place to dampen ongoing immune responses and to prevent autoimmunity, but they also have profound effects in blocking(More)
PURPOSE A single vaccination of intact or reconstituted-lymphopenic mice (RLM) with a granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting B16BL6-D5 melanoma cell line induces protective antitumor immunity and T cells that mediate the regression of established melanoma in adoptive immunotherapy studies. We wanted to study if multiple vaccinations(More)
Purpose: A single vaccination of intact or reconstituted-lymphopenic mice (RLM) with a granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor–secreting B16BL6-D5 melanoma cell line induces protective antitumor immunity and T cells that mediate the regression of established melanoma in adoptive immunotherapy studies. We wanted to study if multiple vaccinations(More)
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