Michael D. Briggs

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Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) constitute a bone dysplasia family, which is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. The disease spectrum ranges from mild MED, which manifests with pain and stiffness in the joints and delayed and irregular ossification of the epiphyses, to the more severe PSACH, which is(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are dominantly inherited chondrodysplasias characterized by short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. The disease genes in families with PSACH and MED have been localized to an 800 kilobase interval on the short arm of chromosome 19. Recently the gene for cartilage oligomeric matrix(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is one of the more common skeletal dysplasias and results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Most COMP mutations identified to date cluster in the TSP3 repeat region of COMP and the mutant protein is retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of chondrocytes and may result in increased cell(More)
Disruption to endochondral ossification leads to delayed and irregular bone formation and can result in a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders known as the chondrodysplasias. One such disorder, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), is characterized by mild dwarfism and early-onset osteoarthritis and can result from mutations in the gene encoding(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are two human autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias characterized by variable short stature, joint laxity and early-onset degenerative joint disease. Both disorders can result from mut-ations in the gene for cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein.(More)
Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type IX collagen are key structural components of the cartilage extracellular matrix and have important roles in tissue development and homeostasis. Mutations in the genes encoding these glycoproteins result in two related human bone dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, which(More)
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a relatively mild and clinically variable osteochondrodysplasia, primarily characterized by delayed and irregular ossification of the epiphyses and early-onset osteoarthritis. Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type IX collagen (COL9A2 and COL9A3) have previously been shown(More)
Pathologies caused by mutations in extracellular matrix proteins are generally considered to result from the synthesis of extracellular matrices that are defective. Mutations in type X collagen cause metaphyseal chondrodysplasia type Schmid (MCDS), a disorder characterised by dwarfism and an expanded growth plate hypertrophic zone. We generated a knock-in(More)
The unfolded protein response (UPR) has evolved to counter the stresses that occur in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a result of misfolded proteins. This sophisticated quality control system attempts to restore homeostasis through the action of a number of different pathways that are coordinated in the first instance by the ER stress-senor proteins IRE1,(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and the p.D469del mutation within the type III repeats of COMP accounts for approximately 30% of PSACH. To determine disease mechanisms of PSACH in vivo, we introduced the Comp D469del mutation into the mouse genome. Mutant animals were normal at birth but grew(More)