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Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) constitute a bone dysplasia family, which is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. The disease spectrum ranges from mild MED, which manifests with pain and stiffness in the joints and delayed and irregular ossification of the epiphyses, to the more severe PSACH, which is(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are dominantly inherited chondrodysplasias characterized by short stature and early-onset osteoarthrosis. The disease genes in families with PSACH and MED have been localized to an 800 kilobase interval on the short arm of chromosome 19. Recently the gene for cartilage oligomeric matrix(More)
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a relatively mild and clinically variable osteochondrodysplasia, primarily characterized by delayed and irregular ossification of the epiphyses and early-onset osteoarthritis. Mutations in the genes encoding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type IX collagen (COL9A2 and COL9A3) have previously been shown(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is one of the more common skeletal dysplasias and results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Most COMP mutations identified to date cluster in the TSP3 repeat region of COMP and the mutant protein is retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of chondrocytes and may result in increased cell(More)
Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and type IX collagen are key structural components of the cartilage extracellular matrix and have important roles in tissue development and homeostasis. Mutations in the genes encoding these glycoproteins result in two related human bone dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, which(More)
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a relatively common skeletal dysplasia that can present in childhood with a variable phenotype of short stature and pain and stiffness in the large joints, and often progresses to early-onset osteoarthritis in adulthood. Mutations in the matrilin-3 gene (MATN3) have recently been shown to underlie some forms of(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are two human autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias characterized by variable short stature, joint laxity and early-onset degenerative joint disease. Both disorders can result from mut-ations in the gene for cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an extracellular matrix glycoprotein.(More)
Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with marked clinical and radiographic variability. Traditionally, the mild "Ribbing" and severe "Fairbank" types have been used to define a broad phenotypic spectrum. Mutations in the gene encoding cartilage oligomeric-matrix protein have been shown to result in several types of(More)
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are autosomal dominant osteochondrodysplasias that result in mild to severe short-limb dwarfism and early-onset osteoarthrosis. PSACH and some forms of MED result from mutations in the gene for cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP; OMIM 600310 [http://www3.ncbi.nlm.(More)
Disruption to endochondral ossification leads to delayed and irregular bone formation and can result in a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders known as the chondrodysplasias. One such disorder, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), is characterized by mild dwarfism and early-onset osteoarthritis and can result from mutations in the gene encoding(More)