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In mammals, genetic recombination during meiosis is limited to a set of 1- to 2-kb regions termed hotspots. Their locations are predominantly determined by the zinc finger protein PRDM9, which binds to DNA in hotspots and subsequently uses its SET domain to locally trimethylate histone H3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). This sets the stage for double-strand break(More)
Meiotic recombination generates new genetic variation and assures the proper segregation of chromosomes in gametes. PRDM9, a zinc finger protein with histone methyltransferase activity, initiates meiotic recombination by binding DNA at recombination hotspots and directing the position of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The DSB repair mechanism suggests that(More)
In many mammals, including humans and mice, the zinc finger histone methyltransferase PRDM9 performs the first step in meiotic recombination by specifying the locations of hotspots, the sites of genetic recombination. PRDM9 binds to DNA at hotspots through its zinc finger domain and activates recombination by trimethylating histone H3K4 on adjacent(More)
Meiotic recombination ensures proper segregation of homologous chromosomes and creates genetic variation. In many organisms, recombination occurs at limited sites, termed 'hotspots', whose positions in mammals are determined by PR domain member 9 (PRDM9), a long-array zinc-finger and chromatin-modifier protein. Determining the rules governing the DNA(More)
The success of high resolution genetic mapping of disease predisposition and quantitative trait loci in humans and experimental animals depends on the positions of key crossover events around the gene of interest. In mammals, the majority of recombination occurs at highly delimited 1-2 kb long sites known as recombination hotspots, whose locations and(More)
Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase.(More)
Genetic recombination plays an important role in evolution, facilitating the creation of new, favorable combinations of alleles and the removal of deleterious mutations by unlinking them from surrounding sequences. In most mammals, the placement of genetic crossovers is determined by the binding of PRDM9, a highly polymorphic protein with a long zinc finger(More)
Arrangements of genes along chromosomes are a product of evolutionary processes, and we can expect that preferable arrangements will prevail over the span of evolutionary time, often being reflected in the non-random clustering of structurally and/or functionally related genes. Such non-random arrangements can arise by two distinct evolutionary processes:(More)
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