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We consider information networks in the absence of interference and noise, and present an upper bound on the rate at which information can be transmitted using network coding. Our upper bound is based on combining properties of entropy with a strong information inequality derived from the structure of the network.The <b>undirected</b> <i>k</i>-<b>pairs(More)
We consider the problem of compressing graphs of the link structure of the World Wide Web. We provide efficient algorithms for such compression that are motivated by recently proposed random graph models for describing the Web. The algorithms are based on reducing the compression problem to the problem of finding a minimum spanning tree in a directed graph(More)
In this paper, we present surplus fair scheduling (SFS), a proportional-share CPU scheduler designed for symmetric multiprocessors. We first show that the infeasibility of certain weight assignments in multiprocessor environments results in unfairness or starvation in many existing proportional-share schedulers. We present a novel weight readjustment(More)
There have been a number of protocols proposed for anonymous network communication. In this paper we investigate attacks by corrupt group members that degrade the anonymity of each protocol over time. We prove that when a particular initiator continues communication with a particular responder across path reformations, existing protocols are subject to the(More)
There have been a number of protocols proposed for anonymous network communication. In this paper, we investigate attacks by corrupt group members that degrade the anonymity of each protocol over time. We prove that when a particular initiator continues communication with a particular responder across path reformations, existing protocols are subject to the(More)
It is well known that after placing n balls independently and uniformly at random into n bins, the fullest bin holds Θ(logn/ log logn) balls with high probability. More recently, Azar et al. analyzed the following process: randomly choose d bins for each ball, and then place the balls, one by one, into the least full bin from its d choices [2]. They show(More)
Consider the following stochastic process executed on a graph <i>G=(V,E)</i> whose nodes are initially uncovered. In each step, pick a node at random and if it is uncovered, cover it. Otherwise, if it has an uncovered neighbor, cover a random uncovered neighbor. Else, do nothing. This can be viewed as a structured coupon collector process. We show that for(More)
We analyze a randomized pursuit-evasion game on graphs. This game is played by two players, a hunter and a rabbit. Let G be any connected, undirected graph with n nodes. The game is played in rounds and in each round both the hunter and the rabbit are located at a node of the graph. Between rounds both the hunter and the rabbit can stay at the current node(More)
There has been considerable recent interest in probabilistic packet marking schemes for the problem of tracing a sequence of network packets back to an anonymous source. An important consideration for such schemes is the number of packet header bits that need to be allocated to the marking protocol. Let <i>b</i> denote this value. All previous schemes(More)