Melissa C. Keinath

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It is generally accepted that many genes present in vertebrate genomes owe their origin to two whole-genome duplications that occurred deep in the ancestry of the vertebrate lineage. However, details regarding the timing and outcome of these duplications are not well resolved. We present high-density meiotic and comparative genomic maps for the sea lamprey(More)
Vertebrates exhibit substantial diversity in genome size, and some of the largest genomes exist in species that uniquely inform diverse areas of basic and biomedical research. For example, the salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (the Mexican axolotl) is a model organism for studies of regeneration, development and genome evolution, yet its genome is ~10× larger(More)
Gene and genome duplications serve as an important reservoir of material for the evolution of new biological functions. It is generally accepted that many genes present in vertebrate genomes owe their origin to two whole genome duplications that occurred deep in the ancestry of the vertebrate lineage. However, details regarding the timing and outcome of(More)
The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) represents one of the few vertebrate species known to undergo large-scale programmatic elimination of genomic DNA over the course of its normal development. Programmed genome rearrangements (PGRs) result in the reproducible loss of ~20% of the genome from somatic cell lineages during early embryogenesis. Studies of PGR(More)
Genetic linkage maps are fundamental resources that enable diverse genetic and genomic approaches, including quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses and comparative studies of genome evolution. It is straightforward to build linkage maps for species that are amenable to laboratory culture and genetic crossing designs, and that have relatively small genomes(More)
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