Melinda Sverteczki

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The covert-rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep hypothesis of dreaming suggests that elements of REM sleep emerge during sleep onset, leading to vivid hypnagogic imagery. Based on parahippocampal electrocorticography of epileptic patients we found an increase in REM-like 1.5-3.0 Hz parahippocampal activity during wake-sleep transition, which peaks after on(More)
The covert-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep hypothesis of dreaming suggests that elements of REM sleep emerge during sleep onset, leading to vivid hypnagogic imagery. We tested the physiological part of this hypothesis by analysing scalp-recorded electroencephalograms of 15 human subjects during wake-sleep transition and subsequent night time sleep.(More)
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