Maurice Schellekens

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Software agents are involved in Internet applications such as E-commerce and E-government may contain identificatory information about their human user such as credit cards and bank accounts. This paper discusses whether human users and software agents are allowed to be anonymous under the relevant legal regimes and whether an adequate interaction and(More)
Software agents are involved in Internet applications such as E-commerce and may contain identificatory information about their human user such as credit cards and bank accounts. This paper discusses whether human users and software agents are allowed to be anonymous and whether anonymity is technically realisable from the perspective of Artificial(More)
Software agents extend the current, information-based Internet to include autonomous mobile processing. In most countries such processes, i.e. software agents are, however, without an explicit legal status. Many of the legal implications of their actions (e.g. gathering information, negotiating terms, performing transactions) are not well understood. One(More)
An important characteristic of mobile agents is that they often do not run on their user's platform, but on the platform of someone else. There often is no pre-existing relation between the 'owner' of the running agent's process and the owner of the platform on which the agent process runs. When there are conflicts the position of the owner is not clear: is(More)
Software agents extend the current, information-based Internet to include autonomous mobile processing. In most countries such processes, i.e., software agents are, however, without an explicit legal status. Many of the legal implications of their actions (e.g., gathering information, negotiating terms, performing transactions) are not well understood. One(More)
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