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Addictive drugs, including ethanol, increase the brain's dopaminergic transmission, and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme has a crucial role in dopamine inactivation. A common functional polymorphism in the COMT gene results in a three- to four-fold variation in enzyme activity. In a previous study, we found an association between type 1 (with(More)
A common functional polymorphism that results in a three- to four-fold difference in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme activity has been related to psychiatric disorders such as ultra-ultra rapid cycling bipolar disorder, drug abuse and alcoholism (Lachman et al., 1996a; Karayiorgou et al., 1997; Vandenbergh et al., 1997; Papolos et al., 1998;(More)
Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme which has a crucial role in the metabolism of dopamine. It has been suggested that a common functional genetic polymorphism in the COMT gene, which results in 3 to 4-fold difference in COMT enzyme activity, may contribute to the etiology of mental disorders such as bipolar disorder and alcoholism. Since(More)
Alterations in monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) expression and enzyme activity may be associated with alcoholism and impulsive behavior. Therefore, functional polymorphisms in the MAOA gene would be good candidates to consider in the interindividual differences that exist in the susceptibility to alcoholism. One variant that has been considered as a candidate in(More)
Both apolipoprotein E varepsilon4 allele (APOE varepsilon4) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) Pro(7)-variant have been reported to be associated with higher serum levels of total and LDL cholesterol. Since APOE varepsilon4 allele is also a major risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the genetic polymorphism of NPY has not previously been(More)
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