Matti Järvisalo

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Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and its extensions are becoming a core technology for the analysis of systems. The SAT-based approach divides into three steps: encoding, preprocessing, and search. It is often argued that by encoding arbitrary Boolean formulas in conjunctive normal form (CNF), structural properties of the original problem are not reflected in(More)
is satisfiable is one of the most fundamental problems in computer science, known as the canonical NP-complete Boolean satisfiability (SAT) problem (Biere et al. 2009). In addition to its theoretical importance, major advances in the development of robust implementations of decision procedures for SAT, SAT solvers, have established SAT as an important(More)
Recent approaches to causal discovery based on Boolean satisfiability solvers have opened new opportunities to consider search spaces for causal models with both feedback cycles and unmeasured confounders. However, the available methods have so far not been able to provide a principled account of how to handle conflicting constraints that arise from(More)
Decision procedures for Boolean satisfiability (SAT), especially modern conflict-driven clause learning (CDCL) solvers, act routinely as core solving engines in various real-world applications. Preprocessing, i.e., applying formula rewriting/simplification rules to the input formula before the actual search for satisfiability, has become an essential part(More)
This paper develops techniques for efficiently detecting redundancies in CNF formulas. We introduce the concept of hidden literals, resulting in the novel technique of hidden literal elimination. We develop a practical simplification algorithm that enables “Unhiding” various redundancies in a unified framework. Based on time stamping literals in the binary(More)
Boolean satisfiability (SAT) and its extensions have become a core technology in many application domains, such as planning and formal verification, and continue finding various new application domains today. The SAT-based approach divides into three steps: encoding, preprocessing, and search. It is often argued that by encoding arbitrary Boolean formulas(More)
This paper studies the relative efficiency of variations of a tableau method for Boolean circuit satisfiability checking. The considered method is a nonclausal generalisation of the Davis–Putnam–Logemann–Loveland (DPLL) procedure to Boolean circuits. The variations are obtained by restricting the use of the cut (splitting) rule in several natural ways. It(More)