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Coronamic acid (CMA), an ethylcyclopropyl amino acid derived from isoleucine, functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of coronatine, a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180. The DNA required for CMA biosynthesis (6.9 kb) was sequenced, revealing three distinct open reading frames (ORFs) which share a(More)
The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora causes fire blight on members of the family Rosaceae, with economic importance on apple and pear. During pathogenesis, the bacterium is exposed to a variety of plant-borne antimicrobial compounds. In plants of Rosaceae, many constitutively synthesized isoflavonoids affecting microorganisms were identified. Bacterial(More)
The plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180.N9 synthesizes high levels of the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR) at 18 degrees C, whereas no detectable toxin is produced at 28 degrees C. Previously, we reported that the temperature-sensitive activation of three promoters within the COR biosynthetic gene cluster might explain(More)
Biosynthesis of the phytotoxin coronatine (COR) in Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 is regulated by temperature at the transcriptional level. A 3.4-kb DNA fragment from the COR biosynthetic gene cluster restored temperature-regulated phytotoxin production to Tn5 mutants defective in COR production. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this fragment(More)
Coronamic acid (CMA; 2-ethyl-1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid) is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of coronatine (COR), a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180. Tn5 mutagenesis and substrate feeding studies were previously used to characterize regions of the COR biosynthetic gene cluster required for(More)
A modified two-component regulatory system consisting of the histidine protein kinase CorS and two highly homologous response regulators, CorR and CorP, controls biosynthesis of the polyketide phytotoxin coronatine (COR) by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 in a temperature-dependent manner. COR synthesis is maximal at 18° C but does not occur at 28°(More)
Coronatine (COR) is a non-host-specific phytotoxin that is produced by several different pathovars in the species Pseudomonas syringae. COR consists of two distinct components: coronafacic acid (CFA), which is synthesized via the polyketide pathway, and coronamic acid (CMA), a cyclized derivative of isoleucine. Both CFA and CMA function as intermediates in(More)
Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 produces a chlorosis-inducing phytotoxin, coronatine (COR), which consists of a polyketide component, coronafacic acid (CFA), which is coupled via amide bond formation to coronamic acid (CMA), an ethylcyelopropyl amino acid (aa) derived from isoleucine. P. syringae pv. syringae strains PS51 and PS61, which do not(More)
The indigenous plasmids, pPSR1 and pPSR5, were each shown to confer resistance to ultraviolet light (UV) in Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) pv. syringae FF5. The UV-resistance (UVR) determinant was subcloned from a cosmid library of pPSR1, and sequence analysis revealed the presence of two ORFs, designated rulAB which are homologous to the Escherichia coli umuDC(More)
The phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea produces the exopolysaccharide (EPS) alginate, which is thought to function in epiphytic fitness and virulence. A key regulator for alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and P. syringae is the alternative sigma factor AlgT (sigma(22)). In this study, the contribution of alginate synthesis and(More)