Matthias Groszer

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BACKGROUND Rare mutations affecting the FOXP2 transcription factor cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. We hypothesized that neural pathways downstream of FOXP2 influence more common phenotypes, such as specific language impairment. METHODS We performed genomic screening for regions bound by FOXP2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation, which led(More)
The embryonic subventricular zone (SVZ) is a critical site for generating cortical projection neurons; however, molecular mechanisms regulating neurogenesis specifically in the SVZ are largely unknown. The transcription factor Eomes/Tbr2 is transiently expressed in cortical SVZ progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditional inactivation of Tbr2(More)
It has been proposed that two amino acid substitutions in the transcription factor FOXP2 have been positively selected during human evolution due to effects on aspects of speech and language. Here, we introduce these substitutions into the endogenous Foxp2 gene of mice. Although these mice are generally healthy, they have qualitatively different ultrasonic(More)
The most well-described example of an inherited speech and language disorder is that observed in the multigenerational KE family, caused by a heterozygous missense mutation in the FOXP2 gene. Affected individuals are characterized by deficits in the learning and production of complex orofacial motor sequences underlying fluent speech and display impaired(More)
Erythropoietin (Epo) is upregulated by hypoxia and provides protection against apoptosis of erythroid progenitors in bone marrow and brain neurons. Here we show in the adult mouse retina that acute hypoxia dose-dependently stimulates expression of Epo, fibroblast growth factor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor via hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha(More)
Suppressor Gene Ralf Lesche, Matthias Groszer, Jing Gao, Ying Wang, Albee Messing, Hong Sun, Xin Liu, and Hong Wu* Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California Department(More)
Forkhead-box protein P2 is a transcription factor that has been associated with intriguing aspects of cognitive function in humans, non-human mammals, and song-learning birds. Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. Reduced functional dosage of the mouse version (Foxp2) causes deficient cortico-striatal(More)
Previous studies have demonstrated that a small subpopulation of brain tumor cells share key characteristics with neural stem/progenitor cells in terms of phenotype and behavior. These findings suggest that brain tumors might contain "cancer stem cells" that are critical for tumor growth. However, the molecular pathways governing such stem cell-like(More)
We previously discovered that mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic communication disorder, primarily characterized by difficulties in learning to make coordinated sequences of articulatory gestures that underlie speech. Affected people have deficits in expressive and receptive linguistic processing and display structural and/or functional(More)
Here we show that conditional deletion of Pten in a subpopulation of adult neural stem cells in the subependymal zone (SEZ) leads to persistently enhanced neural stem cell self-renewal without sign of exhaustion. These Pten null SEZ-born neural stem cells and progenies can follow the endogenous migration, differentiation, and integration pathways and(More)