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What do we know about how science is taught in today's undergraduate classrooms? Currently, data on teaching in college and university classrooms is generally limited to end-of-term student evaluations, intermittent and unstructured peer observations, and self-reported questionnaires. While some surveys report that 63% of faculty 1 report " extensive(More)
1 Introduction The Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol (TDOP) is a structured classroom observation protocol designed to capture nuances of teaching behaviors in a descriptive manner. The TDOP was originally developed as part of an empirical study of the determinants of postsecondary teaching practices. Data obtained using the TDOP protocol can be used(More)
Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for noncommercial purposes by any means, provided that the above copyright notice appears on all copies. of Wisconsin–Madison. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies, WCER, or cooperating(More)
Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for noncommercial purposes by any means, provided that the above copyright notice appears on all copies. (2012). Teaching the way they were taught? Revisiting the sources of teaching knowledge and the role of prior experience in shaping faculty teaching practices (WCER Working Paper 2012-9). The research(More)
Detailed accounts of teaching can shed light on the nature and prevalence of active learning, yet common approaches reduce teaching to unidimensional descriptors or binary categorizations. In this paper, I use the instructional systems-of-practice framework and the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol (TDOP) to advance an approach to thinking about(More)
This study utilizes theory from situated cognition to investigate faculty beliefs about student learning and their influence on teaching decisions. Results of interviews with and observations of 56 science and math faculty found that the two most common beliefs are: (a) students learn best through repeated practice, and (b) students have different learning(More)
Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for noncommercial purposes by any means, provided that the above copyright notice appears on all copies. Any opinions, findings, or conclusions expressed in this paper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies, WCER, or cooperating institutions. A long-standing(More)
Readers may make verbatim copies of this document for noncommercial purposes by any means, provided that the above copyright notice appears on all copies. The research reported in this paper was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation to the University of Wisconsin–Madison (EHR 0227016) for a Mathematics and Science Partnership project(More)