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Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) down-regulates expression of MHC class I products by selective proteolysis. A single HCMV gene, US11, which encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident type-I transmembrane glycoprotein, is sufficient to cause this effect. In US11+cells, MHC class I molecules are core-glycosylated and therefore inserted into the ER. They are(More)
The subclass of cysteine proteases termed lysosomal cathepsins has long been thought to be primarily involved in end-stage protein breakdown within lysosomal compartments. Furthermore, few specific protein substrates for these proteases have been identified. We show here that cathepsin L functions in the regulation of cell cycle progression through(More)
Transcriptomic and proteomic technologies are generating a wealth of data that are frequently used by scientists to predict the function of proteins based on their expression or presence. However, activity of many proteins, such as transcription factors, kinases, and proteases, depends on posttranslational modifications that frequently are not detected by(More)
Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) are a large class of proteolytic enzymes associated with development, immunity, and senescence. Although many properties have been described for individual proteases, the distribution of these characteristics has not been studied collectively. Here, we analyzed 723 plant PLCPs and classify them into nine subfamilies(More)
Cysteine proteases of Plasmodium falciparum are required for survival of the malaria parasite, yet their specific cellular functions remain unclear. We used a chemical proteomic screen with a small-molecule probe to characterize the predominant cysteine proteases throughout the parasite life cycle. Only one protease, falcipain 1, was active during the(More)
Newly replicated Plasmodium falciparum parasites escape from host erythrocytes through a tightly regulated process that is mediated by multiple classes of proteolytic enzymes. However, the identification of specific proteases has been challenging. We describe here a forward chemical genetic screen using a highly focused library of more than 1,200 covalent(More)
Proteases are one of the largest and best-characterized families of enzymes in the human proteome. Unfortunately, the understanding of protease function in the context of complex proteolytic cascades remains in its infancy. One major reason for this gap in understanding is the lack of technologies that allow direct assessment of protease activity. We report(More)
Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 requires proteolytic processing in the endolysosome to initiate signaling in response to DNA. However, recent studies conflict as to which proteases are required for receptor cleavage. We show that TLR9 proteolysis is a multistep process. The first step removes the majority of the ectodomain and can be performed by asparagine(More)
The field of activity-based proteomics is a relatively new discipline that makes use of small molecules, termed activity-based probes (ABPs), to tag and monitor distinct sets of proteins within a complex proteome. These activity-dependant labels facilitate analysis of systems-wide changes at the level of enzyme activity rather than simple protein abundance.(More)
The widespread resistance of malaria parasites to all affordable drugs has made the identification of new targets urgent. Dipeptidyl aminopeptidases (DPAPs) represent potentially valuable new targets that are involved in hemoglobin degradation (DPAP1) and parasite egress (DPAP3). Here we use activity-based probes to demonstrate that specific inhibition of(More)