Matthew F Tector

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Xenotransplantation has the potential to alleviate the organ shortage that prevents many patients with end-stage renal disease from enjoying the benefits of kidney transplantation. Despite significant advances in other models, pig-to-primate kidney xenotransplantation has met limited success. Preformed anti-pig antibodies are an important component of the(More)
Pigs are emerging as important large animal models for biomedical research, and they may represent a source of organs for xenotransplantation. The MHC is pivotal to the function of the immune system in health and disease, and it is particularly important in infection and transplant rejection. Pigs deficient in class I MHC could serve as important reagents(More)
Xenotransplantation using genetically modified pig organs could solve the donor organ shortage problem. Two inactivated genes that make humans unique from pigs are GGTA1 and CMAH, the products of which produce the carbohydrate epitopes, aGal and Neu5Gc that attract preformed human antibody. When the GGTA1 and CMAH genes were deleted in pigs, human antibody(More)
UNLABELLED Genetically modified porcine models of pig-to-human xenotransplantation offer the most immediate answer to a growing shortage of available solid organs. Recently a modified porcine glycan model has been discovered that reduces human antibody binding to levels comparable with allograft standards. As this background provides an answer to the(More)
We have characterized swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) classes I and II molecules of a domestic pig as a model for use in our xenotransplant program. Molecular characterization of the SLA classes I and II genes is critical to understanding the adaptive immune responses between swine and humans in the event of xenotransplantation. Seven swine leucocyte antigen(More)
BACKGROUND The lethal thrombocytopenia that accompanies liver xenotransplantation is a barrier to clinical application. Human platelets are bound by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGR) on pig sinusoidal endothelial cells and phagocytosed. Inactivation of the ASGR1 gene in donor pigs may prevent xenotransplantation-induced thrombocytopenia. METHODS(More)
The Galα(1,3)Gal epitope (-GAL), created by α-1,3-glycosyltransferase-1 (GGTA1), is a major xenoantigen causing hyper-acute rejection (HAR) in pig-to-primate and pig-tohuman xenotransplantation. In response GGTA1 gene deleted pigs have been generated. However, it is unclear whether there is a residual small amount of α-Gal epitope expressed in GGTA1-/pigs.(More)
BACKGROUND The Galα(1,3)Gal epitope (α-GAL), created by α-1,3-glycosyltransferase-1 (GGTA1), is a major xenoantigen causing hyperacute rejection in pig-to-primate and pig-to-human xenotransplantation. In response, GGTA1 gene-deleted pigs have been generated. However, it is unclear whether there is a residual small amount of α-Gal epitope expressed in(More)
BACKGROUND The rapidly improving tools of genetic engineering may make it possible to overcome the humoral immune barrier that prevents xenotransplantation. We hypothesize that levels of human antibody binding to donor tissues from swine must approximate the antibody binding occurring in allotransplantation. It is uncertain if this is an attainable goal.(More)
BACKGROUND A profound thrombocytopenia limits hepatic xenotransplantation in the pig-to-primate model. Porcine livers also have shown the ability to phagocytose human platelets in the absence of immune-mediated injury. Recently, inactivation of the porcine ASGR1 gene has been shown to decrease this phenomenon. Inactivating GGTA1 and CMAH genes has reduced(More)