Matthew C. Baker

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Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and(More)
BACKGROUND Frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS) is a heritable form of FTD, but the gene(s) responsible for the majority of autosomal dominant FTD-ALS cases have yet to be found. Previous studies have identified a region on chromosome 9p that is associated with FTD and ALS. METHODS The authors report the clinical, volumetric(More)
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is heterogeneous; cases with tau- and synuclein-negative, ubiquitin-positive neuronal inclusions are the most common, and some have mutations in the gene for progranulin (PGRN). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were distinctive clinical and neuropathologic features of frontotemporal lobar(More)
A major recent discovery was the identification of an expansion of a non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the C9ORF72 gene in patients with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutations in two other genes are known to account for familial frontotemporal dementia: microtubule-associated protein tau and progranulin. Although(More)
Recent studies suggest that subcortical structures, including striatum, are vulnerable to amyloid-β accumulation and other neuropathological features in familial Alzheimer's disease due to autosomal dominant mutations. We explored differences between familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease that might shed light on their respective pathogenic mechanisms.(More)
Over 30 different mutations have now been identified in MAPt that cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD). However, there are several families with FTD that show definite linkage to the region on chromosome 17 that contains MAPt, in which no mutation(s) has been identified. Although these families could have a complex mutation of the MAPt locus that has evaded(More)
In some elderly individuals with dementia, hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the only remarkable autopsy finding. The cause of HS in this setting is puzzling, since known causes of HS such as seizures or global hypoxic-ischemic episodes are rarely present. We here describe a series of HS cases that have a widespread neuronal and/or glial tauopathy. Of 14(More)
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), sporadic multisystem tauopathy, and some forms of frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 are characterized by neuronal and glial lesions accumulating tau protein containing 4 conserved repeats in microtubule-binding domain (4R tau). Corticospinal tract(More)
BACKGROUND Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) are the most common known genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and motor neuron disease (MND). We assessed whether expansion size is associated with disease severity or phenotype. METHODS We did a cross-sectional Southern blot characterisation study(More)
Increasing evidence suggests that defective RNA processing contributes to the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This may be especially true for ALS caused by a repeat expansion in C9orf72 (c9ALS), in which the accumulation of RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins are expected to modify RNA metabolism. We report extensive alternative(More)