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Numerous kindreds with familial frontotemporal dementia and/or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have been linked to chromosome 9, and an expansion of the GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the non-coding region of chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 has recently been identified as the pathogenic mechanism. We describe the key characteristics in the probands and(More)
BACKGROUND Frontotemporal dementia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FTD-ALS) is a heritable form of FTD, but the gene(s) responsible for the majority of autosomal dominant FTD-ALS cases have yet to be found. Previous studies have identified a region on chromosome 9p that is associated with FTD and ALS. METHODS The authors report the clinical, volumetric(More)
Recent studies suggest that subcortical structures, including striatum, are vulnerable to amyloid-β accumulation and other neuropathological features in familial Alzheimer's disease due to autosomal dominant mutations. We explored differences between familial and sporadic Alzheimer's disease that might shed light on their respective pathogenic mechanisms.(More)
A major recent discovery was the identification of an expansion of a non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the C9ORF72 gene in patients with frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Mutations in two other genes are known to account for familial frontotemporal dementia: microtubule-associated protein tau and progranulin. Although(More)
Individuals carrying (GGGGCC) expanded repeats in the C9orf72 gene represent a significant portion of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Elucidating how these expanded repeats cause "c9FTD/ALS" has since become an important goal of the field. Toward this end, we sought to investigate whether(More)
BACKGROUND Some patients meeting behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) diagnostic criteria progress slowly and plateau at mild symptom severity. Such patients have mild neuropsychological and functional impairments, lack characteristic bvFTD brain atrophy and have thus been referred to as bvFTD 'phenocopies' or slowly progressive (bvFTD-SP).(More)
Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is heterogeneous; cases with tau- and synuclein-negative, ubiquitin-positive neuronal inclusions are the most common, and some have mutations in the gene for progranulin (PGRN). The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were distinctive clinical and neuropathologic features of frontotemporal lobar(More)
BACKGROUND Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) are the most common known genetic cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and motor neuron disease (MND). We assessed whether expansion size is associated with disease severity or phenotype. METHODS We did a cross-sectional Southern blot characterisation study(More)