Matthew A. Wozniak

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The outcome of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies greatly. The virus associates with serum lipoproteins, including those containing apolipoprotein E (apoE) and apolipoprotein B (apoB), and may enter cells via the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). ApoE genotypes can affect the extent of damage in diseases caused by 2 other viruses--herpes(More)
It is uncertain whether environmental factors contribute to the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the abnormal features that define the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We previously proposed that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a strong risk factor for AD when it is present in the brains of people who possess the type 4 allele(More)
The brains of Alzheimer's disease sufferers are characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. However, the cause(s) of these features and those of the disease are unknown, in sporadic cases. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus type 1 is a strong risk factor for Alzheimer's disease when in the brains of possessors of the type 4(More)
Alzheimer's disease is a modern scourge and is likely to become increasingly so in the future, with increasing longevity. The disease has been investigated for over one hundred years yet its causes and that of the neuropathological characteristics seen in AD brain are still completely unknown. Evidence for a major causative role of a common virus, herpes(More)
BACKGROUND The APOE genotype has a uniquely strong influence on the outcome of viral infection. The mechanism is unknown, although one possibility is direct inhibition of viral entry into cells. METHODS We have examined the direct anti-infective activity of a peptide analogue of the receptor-binding region of apolipoprotein E (apoE) that is known as "apoE(More)
Despite very numerous studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD), especially on amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, little information has been obtained thus on the causes of the disease. Evidence is described here that implicates firstly herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) as a strong risk factor when it is present in brain of carriers of the type 4(More)
It was previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) DNA resides latently in a high proportion of aged brains and that in carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE-epsilon4), it confers a strong risk of Alzheimer's disease. It was suggested that initial entry of brain by HSV1 and any subsequent reactivation(s) would cause a(More)
Almost a hundred years ago, the main neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain were discovered, yet the underlying cause(s) are still unknown, and the disease is basically untreatable. Despite the very numerous studies on the neuropathological features, the cause(s) of their production and whether they have an aetiological role in the(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) afflicts around 20 million people worldwide and so there is an urgent need for effective treatment. Our research showing that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a risk factor for AD for the brains of people who possess a specific genetic factor and that the virus causes accumulation of key AD proteins (β-amyloid (Aβ) and(More)
It has been established, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is present in a high proportion of brains of elderly normal subjects and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. It was subsequently discovered that the virus confers a strong risk of AD when in brain of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E(More)