Matthew A. Edwardson

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Stroke is a leading cause of disability, and the number of stroke survivors continues to rise. Traditional neurorehabilitation strategies aimed at restoring function to weakened limbs provide only modest benefit. New brain stimulation techniques designed to augment traditional neurorehabilitation hold promise for reducing the burden of stroke-related(More)
Studies of activity-dependent stimulation in non-human primates suggest that pairing each instance of volitional muscle activity with immediate intracortical stimulation causes long-term-potentiation-like effects. This technique holds promise for clinical rehabilitation, yet few investigators have tested activity-dependent stimulation in human subjects. In(More)
INTRODUCTION Seven hundred ninety-five thousand Americans will have a stroke this year, and half will have a chronic hemiparesis. Substantial animal literature suggests that the mammalian brain has much potential to recover from acute injury using mechanisms of neuroplasticity, and that these mechanisms can be accessed using training paradigms and(More)
by BoNT/A (residues 1 to 197) were reconstituted into vesicles (with 15% PS). As a control, a truncated version of SNAP-25 that mimics cleavage by BoNT/E (corresponding to residues 1 to 180), was tested in parallel [this cleavage event results in a more profound block of exocytosis (13)]. Fusion was abolished by the " BoNT/E " truncation (Fig. 4B). In(More)
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