Matt-Mouley Bouamrane

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We present Meeting Miner, a multimodal meeting browser for navigating recordings of online text and speech collaborative meetings. Meetings are recorded through a collaborative writing environment specially designed to capture participants activities. This information, usually lost in common recordings of multimodal meetings, offers novel possibilities for(More)
Health Information Management Systems (HIMS) face considerable technical and organisational barriers before successful deployment in hospitals. In addition, many existing systems have significant limitations, including: lack of flexibility and adaptability to complex requirements and processes and a general lack of " intelligence ". They offer basic patient(More)
In our participation in the TREC 2011 Medical Records track, we investigate (1) novel voting-based approaches for identifying relevant patient visits from an aggregate of relevant medical records, (2) the effective handling of negated language in records and queries, and (3) the adoption of medical-domain ontologies for improving the representation of(More)
We describe our experience of designing and implementing a knowledge-based pre-operative assessment decision support system. We developed the system using semantic web technology, including modular ontologies developed in the OWL Web Ontology Language, the OWL Java Application Programming Interface and an automated logic rea-soner. Using ontologies at the(More)
An analytical evaluation of search by content and interaction patterns on multimodal meeting records. Abstract It has been suggested that combining content-based indexing with automatically generated temporal metadata might help improve search and browsing of recordings of computer-mediated collaborative activities such as on-line meetings, which are(More)
BACKGROUND Primary care doctors in NHSScotland have been using electronic medical records within their practices routinely for many years. The Scottish Health Executive eHealth strategy (2008-2011) has recently brought radical changes to the primary care computing landscape in Scotland: an information system (GPASS) which was provided free-of-charge by(More)