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Several families have been reported with autosomal-dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), genetically linked to chromosome 9p21. Here, we report an expansion of a noncoding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the gene C9ORF72 that is strongly associated with disease in a large FTD/ALS kindred, previously reported to be(More)
Thirteen families have been described with an autosomal dominantly inherited dementia named frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), historically termed Pick's disease. Most FTDP-17 cases show neuronal and/or glial inclusions that stain positively with antibodies raised against the microtubule-associated protein Tau,(More)
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common cause of dementia in people under the age of 65 years. A large proportion of FTD patients (35-50%) have a family history of dementia, consistent with a strong genetic component to the disease. In 1998, mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) were shown to cause(More)
Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) composed of the microtubule-associated protein tau are prominent in Alzheimer disease (AD), Pick disease, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Mutations in the gene (Mtapt) encoding tau protein cause frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), thereby proving(More)
We describe two extended haplotypes that cover the human tau gene. In a total of approximately 200 unrelated caucasian individuals there is complete disequilibrium between polymorphisms which span the gene (which covers approximately 100 kb of DNA). This suggests that the establishment of the two haplotypes was an ancient event and either that recombination(More)
To identify novel causes of familial neurodegenerative diseases, we extended our previous studies of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies to investigate TDP-43 as a candidate gene in familial cases of motor neuron disease. Sequencing of the TDP-43 gene led to the identification of a novel missense mutation, Ala-315-Thr, which segregates with(More)
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome with a heterogeneous molecular basis. The neuropathology associated with most FTD is characterized by abnormal cellular aggregates of either transactive response DNA-binding protein with Mr 43 kDa (TDP-43) or tau protein. However, we recently described a subgroup of FTD patients, representing around 10%,(More)
The most common pathology in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is tau-negative, ubiquitin-immunoreactive (ub-ir) neuronal inclusions (FTLD-U). Recently, we identified mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene as the cause of autosomal dominant FTLD-U linked to chromosome 17. Here, we describe the neuropathology in 13 patients from 6 different families, each with(More)
OBJECTIVES To determine whether TMEM106B single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in patients with and without mutations in progranulin (GRN) and to determine whether TMEM106B modulates GRN expression. METHODS We performed a case-control study of 3 SNPs in TMEM106B in 482 patients with clinical(More)
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are part of a disease spectrum associated with TDP-43 pathology. Strong evidence supporting this is the existence of kindreds with family members affected by FTD, ALS or mixed features of FTD and ALS, referred to as FTD-MND. Some of these families have linkage to chromosome 9, with(More)