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  • Mariely DeJesus-Hernandez, Ian R. Mackenzie, Bradley F. Boeve, Adam L. Boxer, Matt Baker, Nicola J. Rutherford +22 others
  • 2011
Several families have been reported with autosomal-dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), genetically linked to chromosome 9p21. Here, we report an expansion of a noncoding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the gene C9ORF72 that is strongly associated with disease in a large FTD/ALS kindred, previously reported to be(More)
  • Matt Baker, Ian R Mackenzie, Stuart M Pickering-Brown, Jennifer Gass, Rosa Rademakers, Caroline Lindholm +21 others
  • 2006
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most common cause of dementia in people under the age of 65 years. A large proportion of FTD patients (35-50%) have a family history of dementia, consistent with a strong genetic component to the disease. In 1998, mutations in the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) were shown to cause(More)
Loss-of-function mutations in progranulin (GRN) cause ubiquitin- and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive frontotemporal dementia (FTLD-U), a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting approximately 10% of early-onset dementia patients. Here we expand the role of GRN in FTLD-U and demonstrate that a common genetic variant (rs5848), located in(More)
  • Michael A Gitcho, Robert H Baloh, Sumi Chakraverty, Kevin Mayo, Joanne B Norton, Denise Levitch +11 others
  • 2008
To identify novel causes of familial neurodegenerative diseases, we extended our previous studies of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathies to investigate TDP-43 as a candidate gene in familial cases of motor neuron disease. Sequencing of the TDP-43 gene led to the identification of a novel missense mutation, Ala-315-Thr, which segregates with(More)
Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome with a heterogeneous molecular basis. The neuropathology associated with most FTD is characterized by abnormal cellular aggregates of either transactive response DNA-binding protein with Mr 43 kDa (TDP-43) or tau protein. However, we recently described a subgroup of FTD patients, representing around 10%,(More)
Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the(More)
Two studies recently identified a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72) as the cause of chromosome 9p-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In a cohort of 231 probands with ALS, we identified the C9ORF72 mutation in 17 familial (27.4%)(More)
We previously reported a kindred with three cases of dementia, in which the proband exhibited features typical of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism (FTDP). An arginine insertion at codon 352 (insR352) in the presenilin-1 (PSEN1) gene was identified in the proband, but analyses in plasma and CSF suggested a mechanism of neurodegeneration not directly(More)
  • Nicola J. Rutherford, Yong-Jie Zhang, Matt Baker, Jennifer M. Gass, NiCole A. Finch, Ya-Fei Xu +25 others
  • 2008
The TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as the major disease protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-U), defining a novel class of neurodegenerative conditions: the TDP-43 proteinopathies. The first pathogenic mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (TARDBP) were(More)