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Simulations with the Hadley Centre general circulation model (HadCM3), including carbon cycle model and forced by a 'business-as-usual' emissions scenario, predict a rapid loss of Amazonian rainforest from the middle of this century onwards. The robustness of this projection to both uncertainty in physical climate drivers and the formulation of the land(More)
Climateprediction.net aims to harness the spare CPU cycles of a million individual users' PCs to run a massive ensemble of climate simulations using an up-to-date, full resolution, three dimensional atmosphere-ocean climate model. The project has many similarities with other public-resource high-throughput activities but is distinctive in a number of ways(More)
project is developing the software necessary to carry out such a project in the public domain. 1 In this article, we describe the development of the demonstration release software, along with the computational challenges such as data mining, visualization, and distributed database management that the project will address in the future. The project(More)
Linear teleconnections to winter climate in Europe are known to be very small (Kiladis and Diaz, 1989; van Oldenborgh et al., 2000), much smaller than in spring and fall. In Dec–Feb, of the 168 ECD (Klein Tank et al., 2002) precipitation stations (average record length 80 years), only 4 have a significant correlation with the Niño3 index (SST anomalies in 5(More)
Future changes in meridional sea surface temperature (SST) gradients in the tropical Atlantic could influence Amazon dry-season precipitation by shifting the patterns of moisture convergence and vertical motion. Unlike for the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, there are no standard indices for quantifying this gradient. Here we describe a method for identifying(More)
The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon is a naturally occurring climate fluctuation, which originates in the tropical Pacific region and affects ecosystems, agriculture, freshwater supplies, hurricanes and other severe weather events worldwide (Goddard and Dilley 2005; McPhaden et al. 2006). Despite considerable progress in our understanding of(More)