Marzieh Salehi

Learn More
OBJECTIVE Gastric bypass (GB) surgery is associated with postprandial hyperinsulinemia, and this effect is accentuated in postsurgical patients who develop recurrent hypoglycemia. Plasma levels of the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are dramatically increased after GB, suggesting that its action contributes to alteration in postprandial glucose(More)
OBJECTIVE The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) account for up to 60% of postprandial insulin release in healthy people. Previous studies showed a reduced incretin effect in patients with type 2 diabetes but a robust response to exogenous GLP-1. The primary goal of this study was to determine(More)
OBJECTIVE Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (GB) is characterized by accentuated but short-lived postprandial elevations of blood glucose and insulin. This profile has been attributed to effects of relative hyperglycemia to directly stimulate β-cells and an augmented incretin effect. An additional glucose-independent stimulation of insulin secretion in GB(More)
To date, weight loss surgeries are the most effective treatment for obesity and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG), two widely used bariatric procedures for the treatment of obesity, induce diabetes remission independent of weight loss while glucose improvement after(More)
R oux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery induces remission of type 2 diabetes (T2D) at higher rates than restrictive bariatric surgeries (1) or intensive medical treatment (2). While weight loss induced by lifestyle interventions or bariatric surgery improves glucose tolerance gradually by enhancing insulin sensitivity (3–5), some of the antidiabetic effect(More)
The incretin effect, reflecting the enhancement of postprandial insulin secretion by factors including the intestinal hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, increases in proportion to meal size. However, it is unknown whether the incretin effect is dependent on ambient glucose. The goal of this study was(More)
  • 1